warts%20-%20cutaneous
WARTS - CUTANEOUS
Cutaneous warts, also called verrucae, are benign proliferations of skin caused by human papillomavirus (HPV).
Most common warts on the hands and feet are due to HPV types 1, 2, 4, 27 & 57.
HPV is usually transmitted by contact with skin of an infected individual or by transmission of virus living in warm moist environment.
Autoinoculation may occur from traumatizing lesions by biting or scratching.
Incubation period is unknown but may range from months to years.

Introduction

  • Occurs in 10% of children & young adults w/ greatest incidence in 12 to 16 years old children
    • May regress spontaneously w/in 2 years in 40% of children
  • May continue to increase in size & distribution & may become more resistant to treatment over time

Definition

  • Also called verrucae, they are benign proliferation of skin caused by human papilloma virus (HPV)

Etiology

  • Most common warts on the hands & feet are due to HPV types 1, 2, 4, 27 & 57

Pathophysiology

  • HPV is usually transmitted by contact w/ skin of an infected individual or by transmission of virus living in warm, moist environment
    • Autoinoculation may occur from traumatizing lesions by biting or scratching
    • Incubation period is unknown but may range from months to years
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