vitiligo
VITILIGO
Vitiligo is an acquired, often familial, melanocytopenic disorder that produces focal depigmentation of the skin.
About half of the patients has onset of lesion before the age of 20.
It is a progressive disease wherein spontaneous repigmentation may occur within 6 months.
Precipitating factors include emotional stress, sunburn, chemical exposure, skin trauma, inflammation, irritation or rash that may precede the lesions by 2-3 months.
Lesions are white-colored macules or patches with well-defined borders and otherwise normal skin surface.

Surgical Intervention

Should only be used in non-progressive, small areas of inactive vitiligo

  • Eg epidermal blister grafting, autologous mini punch grafting, ultrathin epidermal sheet grafting, micropigmentation (tattooing), etc
  • May be an option if topical steroids or photochemotherapy fail to repigment
    • Surgery is usually limited to patients who have segmented or localized disease
    • May be used in some generalized patients
  • The following areas tend not to repigment well:
    • Forehead, hairline, dorsal fingers & ankles
  • Follow surgery w/ phototherapy

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