venous%20thromboembolism%20-%20management
VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM - MANAGEMENT
Deep vein thrombosis is a frequent manifestation of venous thromboembolism in which there is a blood clot blocking a deep vein.
Clinical findings are important to the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis but are poor predictors of the presence or severity of thrombosis.
Pulmonary embolism is the blockage of the blood vessels in the lungs usually due to blood clots from the veins, especially veins in the legs and pelvis.
Dyspnea, pleuritic chest pain, syncope and tachypnea occur in most cases of pulmonary embolism.
Massive pulmonary embolism has the prime symptom of dyspnea and systemic arterial hypotension, that requires pressor support, is the predominant sign.

Venous%20thromboembolism%20-%20management Patient Education

Patient Education

  • Educate patients and their families about DVT/PE, especially its signs and symptoms, risk of recurrence of disease, risk of long-term disability and about the possibility of genetic predisposition
  • Explain treatment options to patients and discuss the benefits, risks and side effects of anticoagulation therapy
  • Discuss lifestyle issues with patients
  • Advise patients to drink plenty of fluids
  • Lay public may not be familiar with PE and discussing it may assuage their emotional burden
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