venous%20thromboembolism%20-%20management
VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM - MANAGEMENT
Deep vein thrombosis is a frequent manifestation of venous thromboembolism in which there is a blood clot blocking a deep vein.
Clinical findings are important to the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis but are poor predictors of the presence or severity of thrombosis.
Pulmonary embolism is the blockage of the blood vessels in the lungs usually due to blood clots from the veins, especially veins in the legs and pelvis.
Dyspnea, pleuritic chest pain, syncope and tachypnea occur in most cases of pulmonary embolism.
Massive pulmonary embolism has the prime symptom of dyspnea and systemic arterial hypotension, that requires pressor support, is the predominant sign.

Patient Education

  • Educate patients and their families about DVT/PE, especially risk of recurrence of disease, risk of long-term disability and about the possibility of genetic predisposition
  • Explain treatment options to patients and discuss the benefits, risks and side effects of anticoagulation therapy
  • Discuss lifestyle issues with patients
  • Advise patients to drink plenty of fluids
  • Lay public may not be familiar with PE and discussing it may assuage their emotional burden
Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Cardiology - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
11 Oct 2019
Blood transfusion occurs with a striking frequency among autologous breast reconstruction patients and is associated with an increased risk of surgery-related complications, a recent study has found.
Pank Jit Sin, 16 Oct 2019
While a diagnosis of cancer is often met with concern and devastation, the same is barely true for heart failure. However, the mortality rate for those suffering from heart failure is worse than some common cancers, such as prostate and breast cancers. 
Naomi Rodrig, 04 Sep 2017

Late-breaking data presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2017 in Barcelona, Spain have shown that ibuprofen is associated with greater increase in blood pressure (BP) than celecoxib or naproxen in patients with arthritis, potentially increasing their risk of cardiovascular (CV) events. [Eur Heart J 2017, doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehx508]