varicella-zoster%20virus%20infection
VARICELLA-ZOSTER VIRUS INFECTION
Varicella, also known as chickenpox, is a self-limited benign disease caused by primary varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection characterized by fever, malaise, and generalized pruritic vesicular rash.
The average incubation period is 14-16 days. It is transmitted via direct contact with vesicular fluid or inhalation of aerosolized respiratory secretions or via droplet route during face-to-face contact.
Hallmark sign is pruritic rash that begins in the scalp and face which eventually spreads to the trunks and extremities.
Drug Information

Indication: Treatment & prophylaxis of herpes genitalis, treatment of herpes zoster, herpes simples & varicella (chickenpo...

Indication: Herpes zoster. Reduces duration & proportion of patients w/ zoster-associated pain, which includes acute &...

Indication: Active immunisation against varicella of healthy subjects ≥12 mth, susceptible high-risk patients & the...

Indication: Herpes simplex & varicella zoster infections. Herpes simplex infection prophylaxis in immunocompromised pa...

Indication: Varicella-zoster viral infections. Skin & mucous membrane infections due to herpes simplex virus. Prophyla...

Indication: Skin & mucous membrane infections caused by HSV including initial & recurrent genital herpes & her...

Indication: Herpes simplex virus, varicella & herpes zoster infections. Suppression & prophylaxis of herpes simple...

Indication: Treatment & suppression of herpes simplex infection. Prophylaxis of herpes simplex infection in immunocomp...

Indication: Herpes simplex skin infections including herpes genitalis & herpes labialis.

Indication: Herpes simplex & varicella zoster infection. Prophylaxis of herpes simplex infection in immunocompromised ...

2  /  4
Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Infectious Diseases - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Tristan Manalac, 14 May 2020
Liver injuries appear to be more common in severe cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a new meta-analysis reports.
16 May 2020
There appears to be no evidence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in the semen of patients recovering from COVID-19 a month after diagnosis, according to a study, suggesting that the virus is unlikely to gain entry into testicular cells through an ACE2/TMPRSS2-mediated mechanism.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 15 May 2020
In the fight against the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, healthcare workers experience a range of physical symptoms, which are strongly related to psychological distress, according to a study, suggesting a bidirectional relationship between physical symptoms and psychological outcomes.