urticaria
URTICARIA
Urticaria is characterized by sudden appearance of wheals and/or angioedema.
The intensity of the pruritus varies but may be severe enough to disrupt sleep, work or school.
It is classified acute if the urticaria has been present for <6 weeks and chronic if >6 weeks. A specific cause is more likely to be identified in acute cases.
It can be triggered by immunological or nonimmunological mechanism.

Patient Education

  • Explain to the patient the nature of urticaria and convey a realistic expectation from available treatment options
  • Reassure the patient
    • Majority of acute urticaria cases resolve spontaneously
    • Chronic urticaria is benign (except in cases of angioedema where life-threatening airway closure can be a risk)
  •  Application of cooling lotions with menthol to control itchiness
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