tourette's%20syndrome%20-and-%20other%20tic%20disorders
TOURETTE'S SYNDROME & OTHER TIC DISORDERS
Tics are sudden, rapid, non-rhytmic, repetitive, motor movements or vocalizations. The mean age of onset is approximately 5 years old.
Tourette's syndrome is the most common form of tic disorder.
There is a strong genetic component showing a 10- to 100-fold increase in the rates of tics and Tourette's syndrome among first-degree relatives of Tourette's syndrome patients.
Simple motor tics are restricted to a single or a few muscle groups and last less than a fraction of a second.
Complex motor tics involve larger muscle groups, usually last longer and appear purposeful and goal-directed.

Tourette's%20syndrome%20-and-%20other%20tic%20disorders Patient Education

Patient Education

  • Educate the people who interact with the patient regarding variability of tics, natural history, treatment of the disorder, prognosis & possible coexisting problems
  • Refer to local support groups, if available
  • Physician, parents & teachers should work together to provide the best possible school environment for children with tic disorders
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