Most Read Articles
Hannah Wong, 30 Sep 2019

Taisho Pharmaceutical launches Lusefi®, an oral anti-diabetic medication for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The medication is expected to lower blood glucose and provide adequate glycaemic control, serving as a new alternative prescription for T2DM. Lusefi, with its active ingredient luseogliflozin hydrate, is available in the form of 2.5 mg and 5 mg tablets.

07 Oct 2019
In pancreatic cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, the presence of diabetes mellitus is associated with reduced survival and larger tumour, as well as with increased risk of death after treatment, according to a meta-analysis.
01 Apr 2019
Basal-bolus therapy using glargine 300 U/mL and insulin glulisine is superior to twice-daily injections of insulin degludec/aspart for glycaemic control without increasing the risk of hypoglycaemia, a new study suggests.

Vitamin D3 supplementation not an effective defence strategy against diabetes

14 Aug 2019

Supplementation with vitamin D3 at a dose of 4,000 IU per day does not significantly stave off the risk of diabetes in high-risk individuals with or without vitamin D insufficiency, according to data from the Vitamin D and Type 2 Diabetes (D2D) trial.

D2D randomized 2,423 adults free of diabetes but who met at least two of three glycaemic criteria for prediabetes (fasting plasma glucose level, 100–125 mg/dl; plasma glucose level 2 hours after a 75-g oral glucose load, 140–199 mg/dl; and HbA1c level, 5.7–6.4 percent) to receive either 4,000 IU per day of vitamin D3 (n=1,211) or placebo, regardless of the baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level.

By month 24, the mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level increased in the vitamin D group (from 27.7 ng/ml at baseline to 54.3 ng/ml) but remained stable in the placebo group (from 28.2 ng/ml at baseline to 28.8 ng/ml).

Over a median follow-up of 2.5 years, the primary outcome of new-onset diabetes occurred in 293 participants in the vitamin D group and 323 in the placebo group, resulting in incidence rates of 9.39 and 10.66 events per 100 person-years, respectively. Cox analysis showed that vitamin D supplementation did not lead to a significant reduction in the risk of incident diabetes (hazard ratio, 0.88, 95 percent CI, 0.75–1.04; p=0.12).

The incidence of adverse events (AEs) such as hypercalcaemia, fasting urine calcium:creatinine ratio of >0.375, low estimated glomerular filtration rate and nephrolithiasis, was comparable between the two groups. Overall, AEs led to trial withdrawal in 47 participants (3.9 percent) in the vitamin D group vs 37 (3.1 percent) in the placebo group (difference, 0.8 percentage points).

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Most Read Articles
Hannah Wong, 30 Sep 2019

Taisho Pharmaceutical launches Lusefi®, an oral anti-diabetic medication for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The medication is expected to lower blood glucose and provide adequate glycaemic control, serving as a new alternative prescription for T2DM. Lusefi, with its active ingredient luseogliflozin hydrate, is available in the form of 2.5 mg and 5 mg tablets.

07 Oct 2019
In pancreatic cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, the presence of diabetes mellitus is associated with reduced survival and larger tumour, as well as with increased risk of death after treatment, according to a meta-analysis.
01 Apr 2019
Basal-bolus therapy using glargine 300 U/mL and insulin glulisine is superior to twice-daily injections of insulin degludec/aspart for glycaemic control without increasing the risk of hypoglycaemia, a new study suggests.