Most Read Articles
4 days ago

Dr Michael Lim, a senior consultant at the Paediatric Pulmonary and Sleep Division, National University Hospital, Singapore, speaks to Roshini Claire Anthony on the rare disease that is cystic fibrosis.

2 days ago
Susceptibility‐guided therapy is as effective as empiric modified bismuth quadruple therapy for the first-line treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection, with both yielding excellent eradication rates, as shown in a recent trial.
4 days ago
It appears that long-term consumption of fish and omega-3 fatty acid does not influence the risk of incident hypertension in middle-aged and older men, suggests a US study.
2 days ago
The risk factors and outcomes associated with an increased risk of permanent pacing include atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, multivalve surgery and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III/IV, a recent study has found.

Vitamin D supplementation helps reduce atopic dermatitis severity

01 Dec 2018

Increasing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels to >20 ng/ml on top of standard therapy may yield reductions in severity of atopic dermatitis, a study has found.

A total of 65 atopic dermatitis patients were randomized to receive either vitamin D3 at 5,000 IU/day (n=33) or placebo (n=32) plus baseline therapy (topical steroid, soap substitute and emollient) for 3 months. Disease severity was assessed according to Hanifin-Rajka criteria and the severity scale (SCORAD).

Analysis included 58 patients. Serum 25(OH)D levels at the end of the intervention were significantly higher in the treated vs placebo group (p<0.001).

At week 12, patients with higher serum levels of 25(OH)D (≥20 ng/ml), regardless of whether they received supplementation, had a lower SCORAD relative to those with lower levels (<20 ng/ml; p<0.001). Furthermore, the majority (n=9; 80 percent) of patients with lower vitamin D levels had moderate–severe atopic dermatitis despite standard treatment.

Increased vitamin D levels (≥20 ng/ml) resulting from supplementation was strongly associated with remission of atopic dermatitis (p=0.03). This association persisted in patients with serum levels of ≥20 and ≥30 ng/ml.

The present data suggest that vitamin D3 be considered as a relevant adjuvant in the treatment of atopic dermatitis, researchers said. The dose administered in the cohort proved to be safe and effective for increasing 25(OH)D to levels of sufficiency in 3 months.

Additional investigation is needed to establish the cost-benefit ratio of measuring serum 25(OH)D in patients with AD, particularly those with poor response to standard treatment or with relapses, researchers added.

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Doctor - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
4 days ago

Dr Michael Lim, a senior consultant at the Paediatric Pulmonary and Sleep Division, National University Hospital, Singapore, speaks to Roshini Claire Anthony on the rare disease that is cystic fibrosis.

2 days ago
Susceptibility‐guided therapy is as effective as empiric modified bismuth quadruple therapy for the first-line treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection, with both yielding excellent eradication rates, as shown in a recent trial.
4 days ago
It appears that long-term consumption of fish and omega-3 fatty acid does not influence the risk of incident hypertension in middle-aged and older men, suggests a US study.
2 days ago
The risk factors and outcomes associated with an increased risk of permanent pacing include atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, multivalve surgery and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III/IV, a recent study has found.