Most Read Articles
11 May 2020
This second issue revisits the impact EMPA-REG OUTCOME had on clinical practice and helps readers discover how it gives life back to patients through its cardiovascular indication. Learn how it was approved and the possible mechanisms for its cardiovascular benefits.
Pearl Toh, 15 Oct 2020
Cycling was associated with reduced risk for both all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality in people with diabetes, according to a study presented at EASD 2020 Meeting — suggesting that cycling could be encouraged as an activity to prevent deaths in this population who are known to have a higher mortality risk than the general public.
Elaine Soliven, 15 Oct 2020

Higher levels of exercise appear to be associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with no exercise at all, according to a study presented at EASD 2020.

Elvira Manzano, 12 Oct 2020
Taking regular hot baths may have a positive impact on glycaemia, blood pressure (BP), and body weight among Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes(T2D), according to a real-world study touted as the first to analyse the effect of heat therapy in T2D.

Vitamin D protects against diabetes among people with healthy sleep patterns

20 Sep 2020

Individuals with higher circulating vitamin D concentrations are better protected against type 2 diabetes (T2D), especially those with healthier sleep patterns, a study has found.

The study population included 350,211 diabetes-free individuals. Those with higher 25OHD levels were older, less likely to be current smokers, and more likely to be current drinkers and with lower body mass index. They also tended to have a healthy diet, more sun exposure time in the summer, higher physical activity levels, and healthy sleep scores.

The researchers used five sleep behaviours, including sleep duration, insomnia, snoring, chronotype, and daytime sleepiness, to generate overall sleep patterns, defined by healthy sleep scores.

Over a median follow-up of 8.1 years, 6,940 participants developed T2D. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that serum 25OHD was inversely associated with the risk of incident T2D, and the higher the concentration, the greater the protective benefit (hazard ratio [HR] per 10 nmol/L increase, 0.88, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.87–0.90).

The association was modified by overall sleep patterns (p=0.002), such that the reduction in T2D risk conferred by higher serum 25OHD concentrations was more pronounced among participants with healthier sleep patterns. Among the individual sleep behaviours, daytime sleepiness showed the strongest modification effect (p=0.0006).

Finally, the genetic variations of the sleep patterns did not modify the relation between 25OHD and T2D.

The present data may have implications for T2D prevention strategies. People who have low vitamin D levels may benefit from supplementation, particularly those with daytime sleepiness, according to the researchers.

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Most Read Articles
11 May 2020
This second issue revisits the impact EMPA-REG OUTCOME had on clinical practice and helps readers discover how it gives life back to patients through its cardiovascular indication. Learn how it was approved and the possible mechanisms for its cardiovascular benefits.
Pearl Toh, 15 Oct 2020
Cycling was associated with reduced risk for both all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality in people with diabetes, according to a study presented at EASD 2020 Meeting — suggesting that cycling could be encouraged as an activity to prevent deaths in this population who are known to have a higher mortality risk than the general public.
Elaine Soliven, 15 Oct 2020

Higher levels of exercise appear to be associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with no exercise at all, according to a study presented at EASD 2020.

Elvira Manzano, 12 Oct 2020
Taking regular hot baths may have a positive impact on glycaemia, blood pressure (BP), and body weight among Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes(T2D), according to a real-world study touted as the first to analyse the effect of heat therapy in T2D.