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Vitamin D deficient COVID-19 patients at risk of morbidity, mortality

25 Nov 2020

Vitamin D deficiency may be a contributing factor to the mortality rate among patients with the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), reports a new study.

The study included 154 COVID-19 patients between the ages of 30 and 60 years, of whom 91 were asymptomatic and 63 had severe disease and needed intensive care. Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin-D (25(OH)D) were measured along with routine laboratory tests, such as complete blood count and renal function.

Asymptomatic COVID-19 patients had significantly higher levels of serum 25(OH)D relative to their counterparts who had severe disease (27.89±6.21 vs 14.35±5.79 ng/mL; p=0.0001).

In addition, 31.86 percent of asymptomatic patients were vitamin D deficient, having serum levels <20 ng/mL, as opposed to nearly all patients (96.82 percent) with severe disease. When the 25(OH)D deficiency cutoff was set at <3 ng/mL, 31.86 percent and 96.82 percent were found to be vitamin D deficient in the respective patient groups.

Patients with vitamin D deficiency likewise saw significant elevations in serum inflammatory markers relative to their normal-level counterparts. Such markers included interleukin-6 (19.34±6.17 vs 12.18±4.29 pg/mL; p=0.03) and ferritin (319.17±38.21 vs 186.83±20.18 ng/mL; p=0.0003).

In terms of outcome, patients with vitamin D deficiency also saw a greater mortality rate than those with normal serum levels (21 percent vs 3.1 percent).

“Vitamin D deficiency markedly increases the chance of having severe disease after infection with SARS CoV-2. The intensity of inflammatory response is also higher in vitamin D deficient COVID-19 patients. This all translates to increased morbidity and mortality in COVID-19 patients who are deficient in vitamin D,” the researchers explained.

“Keeping the current COVID-19 pandemic in view, authors recommend administration of vitamin D supplements to population at risk for COVID-19,” they added.

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Most Read Articles
6 days ago
Diagnosis of heart diseases has abruptly and significantly decreased across the globe due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, especially affecting poorer countries, reveals a study.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 01 Dec 2020

An evidence-based, multifaceted intervention aimed at reducing haemodialysis catheter-related bloodstream infections (HD-CRBSIs) failed to improve this outcome, results of the REDUCCTION* trial showed.

Pearl Toh, 18 hours ago
While it is well known that COVID-19 illness is associated with coagulopathy, the optimal anticoagulation strategy remains elusive, and two studies presented at the ASH 2020 Congress further add to the growing debate on the appropriate anticoagulant dose for hospitalized patients with COVID-19.