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Veggies good for lowering bad cholesterol in postmenopausal women

22 Nov 2017

Consuming about four or more servings of dark-green leafy vegetables, as well as corn and tubers, every day may confer benefits for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in early postmenopausal women, a study from Hong Kong has shown.

Researchers examined the associations of total and specific fruit and vegetable consumption with LDL-C status in 508 postmenopausal Hong Kong Chinese women aged 50 to 64 years. All participants completed a food frequency questionnaire and structured interviews to assess dietary intake and obtain data on sociodemographic characteristics, medical conditions, use of medications and lifestyle factors.

LDL-C and total cholesterol levels were measured using biochemical enzymatic techniques and categorized according to the Adult Treatment Panel III classification.

On ordinal logistic regression analysis, the highest quartile of total fruit and vegetable intake was associated with a 33-percent reduced likelihood of having a worse LDL-C status compared with the lowest intake (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.67; 95 percent CI, 0.44 to 1.03).

Specifically, the effect of vegetables on LDL-C status was significantly greater for the highest intake quartile of total vegetables (OR, 0.63; 0.41 to 0.96), dark-green leafy vegetables (OR, 0.60; 0.41 to 0.89), and corn and tubers (OR, 0.62; 0.40 to 0.96). These associations persisted despite further adjustment for total cholesterol.

The present data suggest that consumption of dark-green leafy vegetables, as well as corn and tubers, deserves greater advocacy for their ability to improve lipid profiles and, hence, cardiovascular health in postmenopausal women, researchers said.

Vegetables are good sources of dietary fibre. Potential mechanisms by which they can lower bad cholesterol include 1) increased excretion of faecal bile acids and neutral steroids, 2) altered ratios of primary to secondary bile acids, 3) increased faecal cholesterol and fatty acid excretion, 4) and indirect effects, such as high-fibre foods replacing fat- and cholesterol-containing foods in diet. [J Am Diet Assoc 1994;94:425-43]

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Most Read Articles
6 days ago
The consumption of red and processed meats does not seem to affect the likelihood of symptom relapse among Crohn’s disease (CD) patients in relapse, reports a recent study.
Pearl Toh, 4 days ago
In addition to the known evils of maternal smoking during pregnancy on the son’s semen quality, prenatal exposure to paternal smoking can also be harmful, according to data from a large Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) presented at the ESHRE 2019 Meeting.
6 days ago
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4 days ago
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