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Ultrafine particles in air may increase 24-hour, diurnal DBP

30 Apr 2020
WHO sounds grim warning about deteriorating urban air pollution

An increase in ultrafine particles (UFP) concentrations during the day prior to ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) appears to elevate the 24-hour and diurnal diastolic (D)BP, a study has shown.

“Some studies have reported that UFP play a greater role in cardiovascular diseases than other particle matter, particularly regarding hypertensive crises and DBP, although in the latter such effects were described concerning clinical BP,” the authors said.

This observational study assessed the association between 24-hour ABPM and atmospheric UFP concentrations in Barcelona, Spain. The authors analysed temporal and geographical characteristics of individual patients attending in Primary Care Centres and Hypertensive Units during 2009 to 2014.

A total of 521 hypertensive patients (mean age, 56.8 years; 52.4 percent women) were included in the analysis. Participants had a mean BMI of 28.0 kg/m2. The most common cardiovascular risk factors were diabetes in 66 patients (12.7 percent) and smoking in 79 (15.2 percent).

UFP effects were characterized at short term and up to 1 week (from lag 0 to 7). Each 10,000 particle/cm3 UFP increase measured at an urban background site corresponded to a statistically significant elevation of 2.7 mm Hg (95 percent confidence interval, 0.5–4.8) in 24-hour DBP with ABPM for the following day.

“It has been increasingly demonstrated that UFP play a key role in cardiovascular risk factors and, as we have demonstrated, in good BP control,” the authors said.

Urban areas are notorious for air contaminated with particle matter, and high concentrations could lead to a rise in the risk of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, they added.

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 29 May 2020

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

05 Nov 2019
Low total cholesterol levels appear to carry increased major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) hazard in older men without ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and not receiving statin therapy but not to those on statins, according to data from the CHAMP (Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project) cohort.
Elvira Manzano, 13 Apr 2020
A gout drug that’s been around for years reduced the risk of ischaemic cardiovascular (CV) events when given at a low dose in patients who had myocardial infarction (MI) and was cost-effective, an analysis of the COLCOT* trial has shown.
27 May 2020
Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels appear to be an independent predictor of coronary artery disease in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, a new study has found.