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Trelagliptin once-weekly safe, effective for T2DM with severe renal impairment

27 Aug 2019
Explanation of personalized diabetes report at the CUHK Yao Chung Kit Diabetes Assessment Centre

A once-weekly regimen of 25 mg trelagliptin is effective and safe for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease (ESRD), reports a new study.

Researchers conducted a multicentre, randomized, phase III study including T2DM patients who received either trelagliptin (n=55; mean age, 65.8±10.28 years; 69.1 percent male) or placebo (n=52; mean age, 65.8±10.46 years; 75.0 percent male) for the first 12 weeks. This was followed by a 40-week open-label phase where both groups were given trelagliptin. Eligible participants had renal impairment or ESRD.

At the end of the 12-week double-blind phase, the reduction in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was significantly greater in the trelagliptin vs placebo group (least square [LS] mean difference, –0.72 percent, 95 percent CI, –0.966 to –0.473; p<0.0001).

Similarly, the proportion of patients with HbA1c <7.0 percent was significantly higher in the trelagliptin group (50.0 percent vs 17.1 percent; difference, 32.9 percent, 14.194–51.660). Similar improvements were reported for fasting blood glucose, glycoalbumin and fasting glucagon after the first 12 weeks.

Notably, after the placebo group started receiving trelagliptin during the open-label phase, mean HbA1c level dropped to a level similar to that in the original trelagliptin group.

In terms of safety, there were nominally more treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAE) in the trelagliptin vs placebo group during the double-blind phase (72.7 percent vs 61.5 percent). Five patients had to discontinue therapy due to severe TEAEs, four of whom belonged to the trelagliptin group.

During the open-label phase, the incidence rates of TEAEs in the trelagliptin and placebo groups were 98.2 percent and 100.0 percent. No deaths or serious drug-related TEAEs were reported.

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Most Read Articles
06 Jun 2019
Having at least four pregnancies through childbearing age appears to increase the risk of diabetes in postmenopausal women without a history of gestational diabetes, a study has found.
Stephen Padilla, 07 Oct 2019
Almost half of Asian patients with dyslipidaemia and hypertension, as well as half of those on pharmacotherapy, have achieved their blood pressure (BP) treatment goals, a Singapore study has shown. Moreover, BP goal attainment is significantly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) control.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 30 Jul 2019

Individuals who adhere to a plant-based diet, particularly one consisting of healthy plant-based foods, may reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a recent meta-analysis.

Roshini Claire Anthony, 08 May 2019

Engaging in vigorous physical activity for 75 minutes or more per week could reduce glucose levels in women trying to conceive, a recent study from Singapore showed. However, this impact was not demonstrated in women who engaged in moderate physical activity for 150 minutes or more per week.