Most Read Articles
07 Aug 2020
Concomitant treatment with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) following myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular and bleeding events, a study has shown.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 06 Oct 2020

Several strategies have been proposed to help manage the adverse events (AEs) that emerged during the BEACON CRC trial which assessed the effect of encorafenib plus cetuximab in patients with BRAF V600E mutant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who had progressed after one or two prior regimens.

Thiopurine effective for long-term use in ulcerative colitis but less so in Crohn’s disease

03 Nov 2020

Thiopurine appears beneficial for long-term treatment of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) but not for those with Crohn’s disease (CD) especially where there is perianal involvement, a study has found.

The analysis included 4,968 UC patients (median age, 33 years; median time from diagnosis, 10 years) and 6,960 CD patients (median age, 26 years; median time from diagnosis, 12 years) treated with thiopurine monotherapy in real-world settings. Overall, 11,239 patients (94.2 percent) received azathioprine (AZA) and 2,698 (22.6 percent) 6-mercaptopurine (6MP); these included 2,009 patients (16.8 percent) who received both drugs at different time points.

Median duration of thiopurine was 8 years for CD and 9 years for UC, with treatment initiated a median of 2 years after diagnosis for both groups. Adverse events were consistent with those reported previously, with nausea, vomiting, and deranged liver function tests being the most common. More CD patients permanently discontinued treatment due to pancreatitis (2.7 percent vs 1.2 percent; p<0.0001), whereas a greater number of UC patients had treatment-limiting hepatotoxicity (3.2 percent vs 2.1 percent; p=0.0003).

Thiopurine monotherapy was effective throughout the duration of treatment in 52.7 percent of UC patients as compared with only 34.2 percent of those with CD (p<0.0001). Multivariable logistic regression models confirmed that the drug was less effective in CD than UC (odds ratio, 0.47, 95 percent confidence interval, 0.43–0.51; p<0.0001).

Intolerance to treatment was associated with a significantly greater risk of surgery in UC (hazard ratio [HR], 2.44; p<0.0001) and in CD albeit at a lesser magnitude (HR, 1.23; p=0.0015).

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Most Read Articles
07 Aug 2020
Concomitant treatment with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) following myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular and bleeding events, a study has shown.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 06 Oct 2020

Several strategies have been proposed to help manage the adverse events (AEs) that emerged during the BEACON CRC trial which assessed the effect of encorafenib plus cetuximab in patients with BRAF V600E mutant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who had progressed after one or two prior regimens.