Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 6 days ago
Cycling was associated with reduced risk for both all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality in people with diabetes, according to a study presented at EASD 2020 Meeting — suggesting that cycling could be encouraged as an activity to prevent deaths in this population who are known to have a higher mortality risk than the general public.
Elaine Soliven, 6 days ago

Higher levels of exercise appear to be associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with no exercise at all, according to a study presented at EASD 2020.

Elvira Manzano, 07 Oct 2020
Exendin-4 imaging targeting GLP-1* receptor (GLP-1R) ably detects residual, dysfunctional pancreatic beta cells in individuals with long-standing type 1 diabetes (T1D), according to a study presented at EASD 2020. This breakthrough brings research closer to the possibility of restoring insulin-producing cells depleted in T1D.
Elvira Manzano, 12 Oct 2020
Taking regular hot baths may have a positive impact on glycaemia, blood pressure (BP), and body weight among Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes(T2D), according to a real-world study touted as the first to analyse the effect of heat therapy in T2D.

Suboptimal glycaemic control prolongs ICU, hospital stay in critically ill patients

14 Oct 2020

High-acuity medically critically ill patients who achieve time–weighted average daily blood glucose levels <180 mg/dL while in the intensive care unit (ICU) have a significantly lower likelihood of subsequent hospital mortality, a study has found.

In contrast, those with suboptimal glycaemic control during ICU stay have significantly higher odds of longer-than-predicted ICU and hospital stay.

This retrospective cohort study was conducted at an academic tertiary and quaternary medical ICU. The authors categorized glycaemic control as either acceptable or suboptimal based on time–weighted daily blood glucose averages of <180 mg/dL or >180 mg/dL. They also identified clinical risk factors for suboptimal control and compared outcomes between the two glycaemic control categories.

Of the 974 unit stays over a 2-year period, 920 had complete data sets available for analysis. Sixty-three percent of stays (n=575) were classified as having acceptable glycaemic control and 37 percent (n=345) as having suboptimal glycaemic control.

Patients with diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR], 5.08, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 3.72–6.93), corticosteroid use during ICU stay (OR, 4.50, 95 percent CI, 3.21–6.32), and catecholamine infusions (OR, 1.42, 95 percent CI, 1.04–1.93) had the highest likelihood of suboptimal glycaemic control after adjusting for covariables.

Adjusting for acuity, acceptable glycaemic control resulted in decreased odds of hospital mortality (OR, 0.65, 95 percent CI, 0.48–0.88) but not ICU mortality (OR, 0.81, 95 percent CI, 0.55–1.17). Suboptimal glycaemic control correlated with increased odds of longer-than-predicted ICU (OR, 1.76, 95 percent CI, 1.30–2.38) and hospital stays (OR, 1.50, 95 percent CI, 1.12–2.01).

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Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 6 days ago
Cycling was associated with reduced risk for both all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality in people with diabetes, according to a study presented at EASD 2020 Meeting — suggesting that cycling could be encouraged as an activity to prevent deaths in this population who are known to have a higher mortality risk than the general public.
Elaine Soliven, 6 days ago

Higher levels of exercise appear to be associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with no exercise at all, according to a study presented at EASD 2020.

Elvira Manzano, 07 Oct 2020
Exendin-4 imaging targeting GLP-1* receptor (GLP-1R) ably detects residual, dysfunctional pancreatic beta cells in individuals with long-standing type 1 diabetes (T1D), according to a study presented at EASD 2020. This breakthrough brings research closer to the possibility of restoring insulin-producing cells depleted in T1D.
Elvira Manzano, 12 Oct 2020
Taking regular hot baths may have a positive impact on glycaemia, blood pressure (BP), and body weight among Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes(T2D), according to a real-world study touted as the first to analyse the effect of heat therapy in T2D.