Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 31 Dec 2019
Adding the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir to usual care speeds up recovery from influenza-like illness by a day compared with usual care alone, with even greater benefits seen in older, sicker patients with comorbidities, according to the ALIC4E study.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 19 hours ago

The presence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in individuals with systemic sclerosis is associated with an increased mortality risk, a study from Singapore showed.

23 Dec 2019
At a Menarini-sponsored symposium held during the Asian Pacific Society Congress, renowned cardiologist Prof John Camm provided the latest evidence for chronic stable angina with or without concomitant diseases, with a special focus on the antianginal agent ranolazine and combination therapies. The event was chaired and moderated by Dr Dante Morales from the University of the Philippines College of Medicine.
09 Jan 2020
Acute ischaemic stroke patients who are current or recent smokers are at greater odds of having unfavourable functional outcomes 3 months after the index event, a study has found.

Stewardship-initiated review process helps prevent medication error at discharge

19 Oct 2019
Healthcare professionals should spend sufficient amount of time with their patients in order to elicit information on barriers to medication adherence.

A stewardship-initiated antimicrobial review process shows potential in preventing medication errors at hospital discharge, according to a recent study.

“Developing a systematic process for a multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programme (ASP) team to review all anti-infectives can be a valuable tool in preventing medication errors at hospital discharge,” the authors said.

This study included 45 patients who were discharged on 59 anti-infective prescriptions. Pneumonia (n=10; 22 percent), bacteraemia (n=8; 18 percent), and skin and soft tissue infections (n=7; 16 percent) were the most common indications for such regimens.

Of the patients prescribed anti-infective agents, 19 (42 percent) were identified to have a medication error. Seventy percent of the recommendations by the ASP team had been accepted, and this led to an avoidance of errors in 13 of 19 (68 percent) patients with a medication error prior to hospital discharge.

This prospective study sought to describe a structured, multidisciplinary approach to review anti-infective regimens at discharge and measure the impact of a stewardship-initiated antimicrobial review process in identifying and preventing anti-infective–related medication errors at discharge.

The authors examined adult patients discharged on anti-infectives from October 2013 to May 2014. The ASP classified interventions on anti-infective regimens into predefined categories of medication error.

“Medication reconciliation is a major patient safety concern, and the impact of a structured process to evaluate anti-infective agents at hospital discharge warrants further review,” the authors said.

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Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 31 Dec 2019
Adding the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir to usual care speeds up recovery from influenza-like illness by a day compared with usual care alone, with even greater benefits seen in older, sicker patients with comorbidities, according to the ALIC4E study.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 19 hours ago

The presence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in individuals with systemic sclerosis is associated with an increased mortality risk, a study from Singapore showed.

23 Dec 2019
At a Menarini-sponsored symposium held during the Asian Pacific Society Congress, renowned cardiologist Prof John Camm provided the latest evidence for chronic stable angina with or without concomitant diseases, with a special focus on the antianginal agent ranolazine and combination therapies. The event was chaired and moderated by Dr Dante Morales from the University of the Philippines College of Medicine.
09 Jan 2020
Acute ischaemic stroke patients who are current or recent smokers are at greater odds of having unfavourable functional outcomes 3 months after the index event, a study has found.