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Some meds may be driving weight gain in postmenopausal women

29 Jul 2020

Use of antidepressants, beta-blockers, or insulin appears to contribute to increased weight in postmenopausal women, a study has found.

The study used data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and included 76,252 postmenopausal women aged 50-79 years. Researchers measured weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC) at both baseline and the 3-year follow-up.

All participants completed an in-clinic medication inventory used to identify prescribed medications, including antidepressants, beta-blockers, insulin, and/or glucocorticosteroids. Researchers applied generalized linear models to determine if intermittent or persistent use of weight-promoting drugs was associated with increased BMI and WC.

Baseline data showed that overweight or obese women were more likely to be taking antidepressants, beta-blockers, and/or insulin. Compared with nonuse, use of at least one putative weight-promoting medication was associated with a significant increase in BMI (0.37 vs 0.27 kg/m2; p=0.0045) and WC (1.10 vs 0.89 cm; p=0.0077) over the course of 3 years.

The number weight-promoting drugs prescribed was positively correlated with both BMI and WC (ptrend<0.00001 for each medication used for both variables).

Women who used either antidepressants or insulin, or a combination of antidepressants and beta-blockers, showed the greatest increase in BMI relative to nonusers.

According to the researchers, the present data may help inform clinical decision making and efforts to mitigate medication-related weight gain.

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Most Read Articles
3 days ago
Chest pain appears to be the principal complaint of patients hospitalized with a first myocardial infarction (MI), particularly among those in the youngest age group, a study has found.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 16 Sep 2020
In patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) receiving angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, high dosing confers benefits for the risk of death or hospitalization that are similar to that obtained with lower dosing, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Pearl Toh, 3 days ago
Early and sustained treatments with simplified regimen are the key to achieving good asthma control, said experts during a presentation at the ERS 2020 Congress.
4 days ago
Women with pre-eclampsia are at higher risk of developing heart failure, a study suggests.