Most Read Articles
Christina Lau, 20 Apr 2020

Hippocampal avoidance during whole-brain radiotherapy (HA-WBRT), together with memantine, better preserves cognitive function vs WBRT plus memantine in patients with brain metastases, without compromising survival, a multi-institutional phase III trial has shown.

Natalia Reoutova, 20 May 2020

Cancer patients infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appear to be at higher risk of severe outcomes, including death, but cancer type and treatment serve as better predictors, according to recent research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting I.

At the time of writing, COVID-19 has spread to more than 200 countries and territories, affecting an estimated 4.5 million people and killing over 300,000. Cancer, on the other hand, is newly diagnosed in 18 million people and takes the lives of 10 million every year.

“We have invited physician scientists who are at the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic, taking care of patients with cancer. They gathered prospective information to understand the effects of COVID-19 on patients with cancer, are testing new treatments, and are making this knowledge available to the global research community, so we can all benefit from their experience,” said Professor Antoni Ribas from UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, US, chairperson of the COVID-19 and cancer plenary session of the meeting.

Yesterday
Case presentation: The patient is a 46-year-old Korean lady who first presented with aggravating pleuritic chest pain characterised by a stabbing pain in the chest when inhaling and exhaling. A diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was made from computed tomography (CT)-guided needle aspiration biopsy, and the tumour was found to be epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive (exon 19 deletion). Chest imaging revealed the presence of left-sided pleural seeding nodules. The patient was treated with afatanib with partial response as best response. Ten months after starting treatment, the patient experienced disease progression.

SNPs likely to improve breast cancer risk prediction

Dr Joslyn Ngu
04 Dec 2017

Incorporating polygenic risk scores based on 18 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) into risk stratification for breast cancer will improve screening results, says an expert.

Sharing about his experience leading the PROCAS (Predicting the Risk Of Cancer At Screening) programme in the UK, consultant in genetic medicine Professor Gareth Evans, of the University of Manchester at St Mary’s Hospital, Manchester, UK, said the study showed that it is possible to gather risk information and—using a good risk stratification model—provide accurate assessments of women’s risk of breast cancer. To further improve the accuracy of screening models, mammographic density information and SNPs should be taken into consideration.

Individually, SNPs contributes to minor change in risk for breast cancer. However, when considered together, they may be useful in predicting larger differences in the risk for breast cancer. According to a recently published study in which Evans was the lead author, polygenic risk scores may be used to improve risk assessment for women at increased familial risk who tested negative or have low likelihood of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. [J Med Genet 2017;54(2):111–113]

In the UK, the first mammography screening appointment for women between the ages of 47 and 50 provides an opportunity to assess the risk for breast cancer and inform women of preventive measures. Soon, risk-stratified screening may also be included in the agenda. Currently, the National Health Service (NHS) breast screening programme already provides screening with MRI for women at high familial risk.

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Most Read Articles
Christina Lau, 20 Apr 2020

Hippocampal avoidance during whole-brain radiotherapy (HA-WBRT), together with memantine, better preserves cognitive function vs WBRT plus memantine in patients with brain metastases, without compromising survival, a multi-institutional phase III trial has shown.

Natalia Reoutova, 20 May 2020

Cancer patients infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appear to be at higher risk of severe outcomes, including death, but cancer type and treatment serve as better predictors, according to recent research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting I.

At the time of writing, COVID-19 has spread to more than 200 countries and territories, affecting an estimated 4.5 million people and killing over 300,000. Cancer, on the other hand, is newly diagnosed in 18 million people and takes the lives of 10 million every year.

“We have invited physician scientists who are at the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic, taking care of patients with cancer. They gathered prospective information to understand the effects of COVID-19 on patients with cancer, are testing new treatments, and are making this knowledge available to the global research community, so we can all benefit from their experience,” said Professor Antoni Ribas from UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, US, chairperson of the COVID-19 and cancer plenary session of the meeting.

Yesterday
Case presentation: The patient is a 46-year-old Korean lady who first presented with aggravating pleuritic chest pain characterised by a stabbing pain in the chest when inhaling and exhaling. A diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was made from computed tomography (CT)-guided needle aspiration biopsy, and the tumour was found to be epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive (exon 19 deletion). Chest imaging revealed the presence of left-sided pleural seeding nodules. The patient was treated with afatanib with partial response as best response. Ten months after starting treatment, the patient experienced disease progression.