Most Read Articles
3 days ago
Low-flow nocturnal long-term oxygen therapy appears to be a safe and viable treatment option in children with sickle cell disease and chronic hypoxaemia, a study has shown.
Pearl Toh, 21 Sep 2020
Early and sustained treatments with simplified regimen are the key to achieving good asthma control, said experts during a presentation at the ERS 2020 Congress.
22 Sep 2020
Severely ill patients with COVID-19 have low levels of several nutrients, with vitamin D and selenium being the most prevalent, a study has found. This suggests the possibility that nutritional deficiencies may increase susceptibility to the disease.
5 days ago
A recent study has shown the effectiveness of strength training in reducing both systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP).

Smoking Cessation (Patient Counselling Guide)

05 Jun 2020
Smoking cessation is encouraged to reduce the risk of developing diseases caused by smoking and to improve health in general. Cigarette or tobacco smoking can lead to nicotine dependence and addiction. Every time a person smokes, each puff introduces nicotine into the body, along with 500 different toxic chemicals (eg, hydrogen cyanide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, nickel). Smoking has been found to harm nearly every organ and organ system in the body. It causes cancers of the lung, larynx, mouth, throat, esophagus, kidney, bladder, liver, pancreas, stomach, cervix, colon, and rectum, as well as acute myeloid leukemia. Smoking also causes heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration and cataracts, and worsens asthma symptoms in adults. Smokers are at higher risk of developing infections (eg, pneumococcal pneumonia, tuberculosis, influenza, common colds). It has also been associated with gastrointestinal diseases (eg, peptic ulcer disease), reproductive disorders including premature menopause, erectile dysfunction and sub-fertility in both men and women, circulation problems, periodontal disease (eg, gingivitis and periodontitis) and premature aging of the skin. A pregnant smoker is at higher risk of miscarriage, having an ectopic pregnancy, having her baby born too early and with an abnormally low birth weight, and having her baby born with a cleft lip and/or cleft palate. A woman who smokes during or after pregnancy increases her infant’s risk of death from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Second-hand smoke (also called environmental tobacco smoke, involuntary smoking, and passive smoking) is the combination of “sidestream” smoke (the smoke given off by a burning tobacco product) and “mainstream” smoke (the smoke exhaled by a smoker). It can also increase the risk of stroke and cause lung cancer in non-smoking adults. Pregnant women exposed to second-hand smoke are at risk of having a baby with low birth weight. Children exposed to second-hand smoke are at an increased risk of SIDS, ear infections, colds, pneumonia, and bronchitis. It can also increase the frequency and severity of asthma symptoms among children who have asthma.

* Click below to view the Patient Counselling Guide in Thai
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Most Read Articles
3 days ago
Low-flow nocturnal long-term oxygen therapy appears to be a safe and viable treatment option in children with sickle cell disease and chronic hypoxaemia, a study has shown.
Pearl Toh, 21 Sep 2020
Early and sustained treatments with simplified regimen are the key to achieving good asthma control, said experts during a presentation at the ERS 2020 Congress.
22 Sep 2020
Severely ill patients with COVID-19 have low levels of several nutrients, with vitamin D and selenium being the most prevalent, a study has found. This suggests the possibility that nutritional deficiencies may increase susceptibility to the disease.
5 days ago
A recent study has shown the effectiveness of strength training in reducing both systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP).