Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 4 days ago

Beta-blockers could reduce mortality risk in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and moderate or moderately-severe renal dysfunction without causing harm, according to the BB-META-HF* trial presented at ESC 2019.

Stephen Padilla, 5 days ago
Implementation of the collaborative care in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinic has led to improvements in nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (nb-DMARDs) optimization, adherence to safety recommendations on nb-DMARD monitoring and detection of adverse drug events in RA patients, according to a Singapore study.
Pearl Toh, 6 days ago
Use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) was associated with a significantly increased risk of invasive breast cancer, which became progressively greater with longer duration of use, a meta-analysis of worldwide prospective epidemiological studies has shown.
4 days ago
Blood pressure (BP) in children is influenced by early-life exposure to several chemicals, built environment and meteorological factors, suggests a study.

Smoking, immunosuppression tied to greater skin cancer risk in nonwhite persons

17 Jul 2019
Scientists discover a "sunscreen gene" that has a tumour-suppressing action against skin cancer

While exposure to UV light remains the top risk factor for skin cancer, other variables, such as smoking, immunosuppression and hypertension, also contribute to keratinocyte carcinoma, especially in nonwhite persons, a recent study has found.

Conducting a retrospective chart review, researchers identified 133 patients who had received a biopsy-proven skin cancer diagnosis. All participants identified as nonwhite: 48 were Black (mean age at diagnosis, 66.95±13.09 years; 37.5 percent male), 68 were Hispanic (mean age at diagnosis, 70.12±14.09 years; 45.6 percent male) and 17 were Asian (mean age at diagnosis, 69.60±7.30 years; 64.7 percent male).

Forward stepwise regression analysis showed that smoking, immunosuppression and hypertension were all significantly associated with age at diagnosis (p<0.001). For instance, current smokers received their diagnoses at a significantly younger age than both former and never smokers (60.23±10.72 vs 72.50±10.53 and 69.59±13.67 years; p<0.001 for both).

In absolute terms, current smokers were diagnosed an average of 12.27 and 9.36 years earlier than former and never smokers, respectively.

Similarly, patients who were under immunosuppression were diagnosed with skin cancer at a younger age than their nonimmunosuppressed counterparts (65.21±8.93 vs 69.61±13.64 years; p<0.01).

Hypertension seemed to have the opposite effect, as those with the condition were diagnosed with skin cancer significantly later than normotensive participants (71.25±11.88 vs 61.75±14.52 years; p<0.001).

Race also seemed to be an important factor. Black and Asian participants were significantly more likely to develop squamous than basal cell carcinomas, while both tumour types were comparably likely to occur in Hispanic patients.

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 4 days ago

Beta-blockers could reduce mortality risk in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and moderate or moderately-severe renal dysfunction without causing harm, according to the BB-META-HF* trial presented at ESC 2019.

Stephen Padilla, 5 days ago
Implementation of the collaborative care in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinic has led to improvements in nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (nb-DMARDs) optimization, adherence to safety recommendations on nb-DMARD monitoring and detection of adverse drug events in RA patients, according to a Singapore study.
Pearl Toh, 6 days ago
Use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) was associated with a significantly increased risk of invasive breast cancer, which became progressively greater with longer duration of use, a meta-analysis of worldwide prospective epidemiological studies has shown.
4 days ago
Blood pressure (BP) in children is influenced by early-life exposure to several chemicals, built environment and meteorological factors, suggests a study.