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Sleep problems, depressive symptoms precede onset of certain illnesses

24 Jun 2018

Sleep problems and depressive symptoms, and a combination of both, are differentially associated with the future incidence of physical illness, according to a study.

Researchers followed 7,395 participants (mean age 65.81 years; 54.8 percent female) from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) for 6 years. Sleep and depressive symptoms were measured using an adapted version of the Jenkins Sleep Problems questionnaire and the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale, respectively.

Multivariable logistic regression models showed that depressive symptoms predicted incident coronary heart disease (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; 95 percent CI, 1.04–1.20; p=0.004) and diabetes/high blood glucose (OR, 1.13; 1.04–1.22; p=0.002) independent of sleep problems.

Depressive symptoms and sleep problems both predicted incident arthritis (OR, 1.10; 1.04–1.16; p=0.002 and OR, 1.14; 1.02–1.26; p=0.019).

Finally, the presence of both elevated depressive symptoms and elevated sleep problems increased the likelihood of developing cancer by 67 percent (OR, 1.67; 1.17–2.39; p=0.004) relative to low depressive symptoms/low sleep problems.

Possible mechanisms underlying the link between sleep and disease onset involve the neuroendocrine system and cortisol. Specifically, changes to the neuroendocrine system have been observed after sleep loss, and depression has long been implicated in increased cortisol expression. Modulation of cortisol responses may be pertinent to inflammatory diseases such as coronary heart disease and arthritis, as cortisol is known to be involved in regulation of the immune system. [Sleep Med Rev 2008;12:197-210; Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2011;35:722-729]

Although more work is needed to determine the exact pathways by which sleep and depression operate to affect future disease onset, the present data suggest that sleep problems and depressive symptoms precede the onset of physical illness, researchers said.

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Most Read Articles
Tristan Manalac, 09 Sep 2018
Structured and remote patient management interventions are effective in reducing all-cause mortality and the number of days lost due to unplanned hospitalizations in heart failure patients, according to a recent study.
Radha Chitale, 08 Apr 2016
A trial assessing the implantable CardioFit® device designed to stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system in heart failure patients failed to meet its primary endpoints – reducing the rate of hospitalization due to heart failure or death by any cause.
27 Aug 2018
Obese men appear to have better ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) prognoses than their normal weight counterparts, regardless of metabolic syndrome status, a recent study has shown.
Stephen Padilla, 04 Sep 2018
The prevalence of individuals with hypertension is expected to rise significantly with the implementation of the 2017 American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) high blood pressure guidelines, according to a study.