Most Read Articles
11 May 2020
This second issue revisits the impact EMPA-REG OUTCOME had on clinical practice and helps readers discover how it gives life back to patients through its cardiovascular indication. Learn how it was approved and the possible mechanisms for its cardiovascular benefits.
Pearl Toh, 15 Oct 2020
Cycling was associated with reduced risk for both all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality in people with diabetes, according to a study presented at EASD 2020 Meeting — suggesting that cycling could be encouraged as an activity to prevent deaths in this population who are known to have a higher mortality risk than the general public.
Stephen Padilla, 22 Jul 2019
Zinc supplementation significantly lowers key glycaemic indicators, particularly fasting glucose (FG) in individuals with diabetes and in those who received an inorganic supplement, results of a systematic review and meta-analysis have shown.
Elaine Soliven, 15 Oct 2020

Higher levels of exercise appear to be associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with no exercise at all, according to a study presented at EASD 2020.

Short-term eGFR changes on SGLT2 inhibitor unrelated to long-term trends

22 Sep 2020

The degree of the acute decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) following treatment with luseogliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, varies widely among patients with type 2 diabetes, a recent study has found.

Moreover, the long-term course of change in eGFR appears to be unaffected by this initial acute dip, suggesting a protective effect on renal function.

Researchers pooled four 52-week phase III trials of luseogliflozin for type 2 diabetes. A total of 941 patients (mean age, 60.2±10.5 years) took the drug and were compared to 115 (mean age, 63.7±10.7 years) placebo recipients. Most patients saw reserved renal function, with either normal albuminuria or microalbuminuria.

Researchers grouped the participants into three, according to the degree of eGFR change after SGLT2 inhibitor treatment: acute decliners (eGFR change <–5.1; n=315), moderate decliners (eGFR change ≥–5.1; n=280), and acute elevators (eGFR change ≥0; n=346).

They found that the course of eGFR 2 weeks after luseogliflozin initiation either recovered or was maintained independently of the degree of acute change. The same was true for the rest of the year: the category of acute eGFR change after treatment had no effect on eGFR trends from weeks 12 to 52 (p=0.477).

Instead, the researchers found that a spike in urinary albumin (p=0.01) and a dip in uric acid (p<0.001) were indicative of increasing eGFR from weeks 12 to 52.

“Although the course of eGFR in the chronic phase appeared to be maintained regardless of the degree of acute changes within at least 1 year, further studies are warranted to determine the impact of acute changes in eGFR on the long-term slope of eGFR,” researchers said.

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Most Read Articles
11 May 2020
This second issue revisits the impact EMPA-REG OUTCOME had on clinical practice and helps readers discover how it gives life back to patients through its cardiovascular indication. Learn how it was approved and the possible mechanisms for its cardiovascular benefits.
Pearl Toh, 15 Oct 2020
Cycling was associated with reduced risk for both all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality in people with diabetes, according to a study presented at EASD 2020 Meeting — suggesting that cycling could be encouraged as an activity to prevent deaths in this population who are known to have a higher mortality risk than the general public.
Stephen Padilla, 22 Jul 2019
Zinc supplementation significantly lowers key glycaemic indicators, particularly fasting glucose (FG) in individuals with diabetes and in those who received an inorganic supplement, results of a systematic review and meta-analysis have shown.
Elaine Soliven, 15 Oct 2020

Higher levels of exercise appear to be associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with no exercise at all, according to a study presented at EASD 2020.