Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 5 days ago

Beta-blockers could reduce mortality risk in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and moderate or moderately-severe renal dysfunction without causing harm, according to the BB-META-HF* trial presented at ESC 2019.

Stephen Padilla, 6 days ago
Implementation of the collaborative care in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinic has led to improvements in nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (nb-DMARDs) optimization, adherence to safety recommendations on nb-DMARD monitoring and detection of adverse drug events in RA patients, according to a Singapore study.
Pearl Toh, 09 Sep 2019
Use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) was associated with a significantly increased risk of invasive breast cancer, which became progressively greater with longer duration of use, a meta-analysis of worldwide prospective epidemiological studies has shown.
5 days ago
Blood pressure (BP) in children is influenced by early-life exposure to several chemicals, built environment and meteorological factors, suggests a study.

Secukinumab safe, effective for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

15 Jul 2019

Secukinumab is safe and effective for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, with effects lasting up to a year after treatment initiation, reports a recent study.

A total of 158 patients (mean age, 28±17.7 years; 57 percent male) were included in the multicentre, prospective, observational study. All patients presented with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis and received secukinumab. Follow-ups were conducted every 12 weeks for 52 weeks.

More than a third (34.8 percent; n=55) of the participants had psoriatic arthritis, while 41.8 percent (n=66) and 34.2 percent (n=54) were smokers and drinkers, respectively. Almost half (44.9 percent; n=71) had body mass index >30 kg/cm2 and were characterized as obese.

After 52 weeks, majority (82.9 percent; n=131) of the patients were still on secukinumab and only 27 (17.1 percent) had discontinued treatment. Reasons for discontinuation included lack of efficacy (n=8), loss of efficacy (n=15) and loss to follow-up (n=4).

At week 4, 57 percent of the participants achieved 75-percent reduction in their baseline scores in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). This grew to 83.5 percent and 89 percent at weeks 12 and 24, respectively, before dropping back down to 78.5 percent by week 52.

In comparison, 27.8 percent achieved a 90-percent drop in their baseline PASI scores (PASI-90) by week 4, growing to 62 percent and 64.6 percent by weeks 12 and 24. PASI-90 was at 63.2 percent at the end of the intervention period.

Only 28 participants (17.7 percent) experienced adverse events over the course of the study, the most common of which were headaches and nasopharyngitis (n=9 each; 5.7 percent). Hypertension (n=6; 3.8 percent), oral candidiasis (n=5; 3.2 percent) and diarrhoea (n=2; 1.3 percent) were other such events.

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Doctor - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 5 days ago

Beta-blockers could reduce mortality risk in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and moderate or moderately-severe renal dysfunction without causing harm, according to the BB-META-HF* trial presented at ESC 2019.

Stephen Padilla, 6 days ago
Implementation of the collaborative care in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinic has led to improvements in nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (nb-DMARDs) optimization, adherence to safety recommendations on nb-DMARD monitoring and detection of adverse drug events in RA patients, according to a Singapore study.
Pearl Toh, 09 Sep 2019
Use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) was associated with a significantly increased risk of invasive breast cancer, which became progressively greater with longer duration of use, a meta-analysis of worldwide prospective epidemiological studies has shown.
5 days ago
Blood pressure (BP) in children is influenced by early-life exposure to several chemicals, built environment and meteorological factors, suggests a study.