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Secukinumab safe, effective for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

15 Jul 2019

Secukinumab is safe and effective for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, with effects lasting up to a year after treatment initiation, reports a recent study.

A total of 158 patients (mean age, 28±17.7 years; 57 percent male) were included in the multicentre, prospective, observational study. All patients presented with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis and received secukinumab. Follow-ups were conducted every 12 weeks for 52 weeks.

More than a third (34.8 percent; n=55) of the participants had psoriatic arthritis, while 41.8 percent (n=66) and 34.2 percent (n=54) were smokers and drinkers, respectively. Almost half (44.9 percent; n=71) had body mass index >30 kg/cm2 and were characterized as obese.

After 52 weeks, majority (82.9 percent; n=131) of the patients were still on secukinumab and only 27 (17.1 percent) had discontinued treatment. Reasons for discontinuation included lack of efficacy (n=8), loss of efficacy (n=15) and loss to follow-up (n=4).

At week 4, 57 percent of the participants achieved 75-percent reduction in their baseline scores in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). This grew to 83.5 percent and 89 percent at weeks 12 and 24, respectively, before dropping back down to 78.5 percent by week 52.

In comparison, 27.8 percent achieved a 90-percent drop in their baseline PASI scores (PASI-90) by week 4, growing to 62 percent and 64.6 percent by weeks 12 and 24. PASI-90 was at 63.2 percent at the end of the intervention period.

Only 28 participants (17.7 percent) experienced adverse events over the course of the study, the most common of which were headaches and nasopharyngitis (n=9 each; 5.7 percent). Hypertension (n=6; 3.8 percent), oral candidiasis (n=5; 3.2 percent) and diarrhoea (n=2; 1.3 percent) were other such events.

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Most Read Articles
5 days ago
Supplementation with probiotics may have positive effects in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), reports a recent meta-analysis.
5 days ago
Ensituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting a variant of MUC5AC, shows modest clinical activity with good safety profile in patients with refractory colorectal cancer, according to data from a phase II study.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 30 Jul 2020

Frailty may indicate an increased risk of death from COVID-19, results of the COPE* study showed.

3 days ago
Treatment with tradipitant in patients with idiopathic or diabetic gastroparesis produces meaningful improvements in nausea and vomiting, according to the results of a phase II trial.