Most Read Articles
6 days ago

Dr Michael Lim, a senior consultant at the Paediatric Pulmonary and Sleep Division, National University Hospital, Singapore, speaks to Roshini Claire Anthony on the rare disease that is cystic fibrosis.

4 days ago
Susceptibility‐guided therapy is as effective as empiric modified bismuth quadruple therapy for the first-line treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection, with both yielding excellent eradication rates, as shown in a recent trial.
6 days ago
It appears that long-term consumption of fish and omega-3 fatty acid does not influence the risk of incident hypertension in middle-aged and older men, suggests a US study.
2 days ago
Cabozantinib is not better than mitoxantrone-prednisone at relieving pain in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) with symptomatic bone metastasis, a recent study suggests.

Sarcopenic obesity ups fall risk in postmenopausal women

16 Nov 2018

Sarcopenic obesity appears to increase the rate of falls in postmenopausal women, particularly in those of Hispanic background, reports a recent study.

Using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, researchers evaluated bone and body composition in 9,924 postmenopausal women (aged 50–79 years). Those with both sarcopenia (lowest 20th percentile of appendicular lean mass) and obesity (body fat percentage >42 percent) were determined to have sarcopenic obesity.

Majority (74.7 percent; n=7,415) of the sample were nonfallers reporting at most one fall event in any year. The remaining 25.3 percent (n=2,509) had at least two falls per year and were categorized as fallers.

Stratifying the participants according to age, researchers found that in those who were aged 50–64 years at baseline, all three measures of body composition were associated with higher risks of falls: sarcopenia (adjusted relative risk [RR], 1.32; 95 percent CI, 1.01–1.74), obesity (adjusted RR, 1.22; 1.08–1.37) and sarcopenic obesity (adjusted RR, 1.35; 1.17–1.56).

In comparison, in women aged 65–79 years at baseline, only obesity (adjusted RR, 1.16; 1.03–1.30) and sarcopenic obesity (adjusted RR, 1.21; 1.05–1.39), but not sarcopenia alone (adjusted RR, 1.07; 0.81–1.43), were significantly correlated with falls.

In terms of race and ethnicity, researchers showed that sarcopenic obesity strongly predicted fall incidence in Hispanic (adjusted RR, 2.40; 1.56–3.67) and non-Hispanic White (adjusted RR, 1.24; 1.11–1.39) participants.

Further studies should focus on coming up with age- and race-specific prevention strategies for sarcopenic obesity in postmenopausal women, researchers said.

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Doctor - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
6 days ago

Dr Michael Lim, a senior consultant at the Paediatric Pulmonary and Sleep Division, National University Hospital, Singapore, speaks to Roshini Claire Anthony on the rare disease that is cystic fibrosis.

4 days ago
Susceptibility‐guided therapy is as effective as empiric modified bismuth quadruple therapy for the first-line treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection, with both yielding excellent eradication rates, as shown in a recent trial.
6 days ago
It appears that long-term consumption of fish and omega-3 fatty acid does not influence the risk of incident hypertension in middle-aged and older men, suggests a US study.
2 days ago
Cabozantinib is not better than mitoxantrone-prednisone at relieving pain in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) with symptomatic bone metastasis, a recent study suggests.