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Risks of acute myocardial infarction, heart failure high in inflammatory bowel disease

24 May 2018

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk of developing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or heart failure, although the prevalence of traditional risk factors for such cardiovascular disorders appears to be low, as reported in a recent study.

A total of 736 IBD patients (339 with Crohn’s disease; 397 with ulcerative colitis) and 1,472 matched controls were followed for a total of 11,398 person-years and 17,880 person-years, respectively, for the development of AMI or heart failure.

On Cox proportional hazards analysis adjusted for traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, IBD was independently associated with elevated risks of AMI (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 2.82; 95 percent CI, 1.98–4.04) and heart failure (aHR, 2.03; 1.36–3.03). The increase in the risk of these cardiovascular disorders was observed in both patients with Crohn’s disease (aHR vs controls, 2.89; 1.65–5.13) and ulcerative colitis (aHR vs controls, 2.70; 1.69–4.35).

When assessed separately, the risk of AMI was elevated in systemic corticosteroid users (aHR vs controls, 5.08; 3.00–8.81) and nonusers (aHR vs controls, 1.79; 1.08–2.98).

On the other hand, the risk of heart failure was significantly high in patients with ulcerative colitis (aHR, 2.06; 1.18–3.65) but not in those with Crohn’s disease, and in systemic corticosteroid users (aHR, 2.51; 1.93–4.57) but not in nonusers.

The present data should prompt close monitoring of IBD patients for the development of cardiovascular disorders, researchers said. Additional studies are needed to investigate whether controlling systemic inflammation could ultimately prevent AMI and heart failure in this population.

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Most Read Articles
16 Aug 2018
Cognitive impairment appears to be a risk factor for poor adherence to antihypertensive medication among elderly adults without dementia, a recent study has shown.
06 Oct 2018
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in combination with dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), compared with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), correlate with a reduced risk of bleeding and similar thromboembolic protection in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and/or after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a recent study has shown.
08 Oct 2018
Moderate-intensity pitavastatin appears to lower the incidence rate of new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, a recent study reports.
Pearl Toh, 04 Oct 2018
The lower threshold for hypertension diagnosis in the 2017 ACC/AHA hypertension guidelines does not necessarily entail more pharmacological treatment, says a leading expert in cardiology during a presentation at AFCC 2018, who highlights that the first key step for managing hypertension is lifestyle modification.