Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 5 days ago
A study finds no evidence that using pharmaceutical aids alone for smoking cessation helps improve the chances of successful quitting despite promising results in previous randomized trials and routine prescription of such drugs to help quit smoking.
Elvira Manzano, 2 days ago
Cancer patients at risk for recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) are less likely to experience recurrence with rivaroxaban compared with dalteparin, the Select-D trial has shown, ushering in a new standard of care (SoC) for cancer-related VTE.
Yesterday
Weight loss medications that have received the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval appear to confer only modest positive benefits for cardiometabolic risk profile, according to a study.
2 days ago
The risk of stroke and subsequent mortality is significantly elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a recent study has shown.

Regular exercise protects against future depression

6 days ago

Regardless of intensity, exercising regularly during leisure time is protective against future depression but not anxiety, according to a recent study.

Individuals who underwent regular leisure-time exercise were more likely to have decrease incidence of future depression but not anxiety. This protective effect usually occurred at low levels of exercise and was observed in any intensity.

With the assumption of a causal relationship, the population attributable fraction suggested that 12 percent of future cases of depression could have been prevented if all participants had engaged in at least 1 hour of physical activity weekly after adjustment for confounders.

A small proportion of the protective effect could be explained by the social and physical health benefits of exercise. On the other hand, it appeared that previously proposed biological mechanisms, such as alterations in parasympathetic vagal tone, had no role in explaining the protective effect against depression, according to the authors.

“Relatively modest changes in population levels of exercise may have important public mental health benefits and prevent a substantial number of new cases of depression,” they said.

The present study aimed to determine whether exercise provides protection against new-onset depression and anxiety, the intensity and amount of exercise needed to achieve protection, and the mechanisms that bring about any association.

The authors prospectively followed for 11 years a “healthy” cohort of 33,908 adults, selected based on having no symptoms of common mental disorder or limiting physical health conditions. They collected validated measures of exercise, depression, anxiety and a range of potential confounding and mediating factors.

Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 5 days ago
A study finds no evidence that using pharmaceutical aids alone for smoking cessation helps improve the chances of successful quitting despite promising results in previous randomized trials and routine prescription of such drugs to help quit smoking.
Elvira Manzano, 2 days ago
Cancer patients at risk for recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) are less likely to experience recurrence with rivaroxaban compared with dalteparin, the Select-D trial has shown, ushering in a new standard of care (SoC) for cancer-related VTE.
Yesterday
Weight loss medications that have received the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval appear to confer only modest positive benefits for cardiometabolic risk profile, according to a study.
2 days ago
The risk of stroke and subsequent mortality is significantly elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a recent study has shown.