Most Read Articles
6 days ago
Regardless of birth weight, being obese at preschool age is associated with a greater risk of elevated blood pressure during early childhood, a recent China study has found. A longer duration of breastfeeding appears to help mitigate such a risk.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 3 days ago
In patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) receiving angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, high dosing confers benefits for the risk of death or hospitalization that are similar to that obtained with lower dosing, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis.
06 Sep 2020
Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are at a higher risk of sustaining hip fractures, a recent study has found.
Audrey Abella, Yesterday
Adults who suffered maltreatment during their childhood are more likely to develop cardiovascular disease (CVD), with stronger associations observed in women, a UK study has shown.

Ramadan fasting does not alter cardiac autonomic nervous activity: Lebanon study

14 Aug 2020
Healthy dietary habits vital during Ramadan

Intermittent fasting, as practiced by Muslims worldwide during Ramadan, is safe and does not interfere with the autonomic nervous activity of the heart, according to the results of a Lebanon study.

The authors assessed the effect of Ramadan fasting on the heart rate variability, an indirect measure of cardiac sympathetic stress. Eighty healthy Lebanese females aged 18–25 years monitored for 24 hours when following normal routine were included in the analysis. Thirty-eight and 42 females were enrolled before and during Ramadan, respectively.

Intermittent fasting showed no effect on heart rate variability. The change in heart rate variability between the first and last weeks of Ramadan was not significant (p>0.05).

Morning fasting was the least stressful period (p<0.001), with lower heart rate compared with nonfasting day (p<0.001). Consequently, intermittent fasting did not alter the cardiac autonomic nervous system function, nor the levels of heart rate variability.

A meta-analysis of 15 studies with outcomes on stroke, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure revealed that the incidence of cardiovascular events during the Ramadan fast was comparable to the nonfasting period. Ramadan fasting was not associated with any change in incidence of acute cardiovascular disease. [J Family Community Med 2016;23:73–81]

“Intermittent fasting is an annual religious practice of Muslims worldwide, which affects the physiology of the body due to lifestyle alterations,” the authors of the current study said.

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Doctor - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
6 days ago
Regardless of birth weight, being obese at preschool age is associated with a greater risk of elevated blood pressure during early childhood, a recent China study has found. A longer duration of breastfeeding appears to help mitigate such a risk.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 3 days ago
In patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) receiving angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, high dosing confers benefits for the risk of death or hospitalization that are similar to that obtained with lower dosing, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis.
06 Sep 2020
Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are at a higher risk of sustaining hip fractures, a recent study has found.
Audrey Abella, Yesterday
Adults who suffered maltreatment during their childhood are more likely to develop cardiovascular disease (CVD), with stronger associations observed in women, a UK study has shown.