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Dr. Joseph Delano Fule Robles, 17 Jan 2018

A recent study by The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has identified insufficient services and accommodation, non-standardized cognitive screening and lack of intervention to delay cognitive and health deterioration as issues faced by ageing patients with intellectual disability in Hong Kong. 

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Persistent symptoms, comorbidities, and financial challenges appear to be important factors affecting health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in geriatric cancer patients, a recent study has shown.
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Patients with rare cancers have worse psychosocial and quality of life outcomes compared with the general population of cancer patients, a recent study has shown.

Quality of life, mental health poorer in patients with rare cancers

4 days ago
Cancer is hard enough as it is – unnecessarily increasing the treatment does not help patients, doctors or the practice of healthcare in general.

Patients with rare cancers have worse psychosocial and quality of life outcomes compared with the general population of cancer patients, a recent study has shown.

Using the Distress Thermometer (DT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General version, researchers assessed the mental health status and quality of life in 137 patients (mean age 50 years; 52.6 percent male) diagnosed with rare cancers. Chi-square tests were used to compare the rare vs general cancer populations.

In the study population, the most frequent form of rare cancer was seminoma of the testis, reported in 10.3 percent (n=14) of the participants. This was followed by endometroid adenocarcinoma (7.3 percent) and gastrointestinal stromal sarcoma (5.8 percent). Majority of the participants had received chemotherapy (73.7 percent) and surgery (76.6 percent).

According to the DT scale, almost half (49.6 percent) of the participants had moderate-to-severe distress, which was significantly higher than that in a US-based pan-cancer population (p=0.006). Physical (92.7 percent) and emotional (73.7 percent) problems were the principal drivers of distress.

Results of the HADS showed that the prevalence rates of anxiety and depressive symptoms were 19.7 percent and 15.3 percent, respectively, both of which were nonsignficantly lower than those in the pan-cancer cohort (24.0 percent and 15.3 percent, respectively).

Multivariate analysis identified various risk factors. Younger age was associated with significantly higher levels of distress (p=0.02), as were female sex (p<0.01) and undergoing evaluation during the active treatment phase (p=0.03). Female sex (p=0.0002) and being younger (p=0.04) were associated with greater anxiety.

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Most Read Articles
Dr. Joseph Delano Fule Robles, 17 Jan 2018

A recent study by The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has identified insufficient services and accommodation, non-standardized cognitive screening and lack of intervention to delay cognitive and health deterioration as issues faced by ageing patients with intellectual disability in Hong Kong. 

27 Dec 2017
Persistent symptoms, comorbidities, and financial challenges appear to be important factors affecting health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in geriatric cancer patients, a recent study has shown.
4 days ago
Patients with rare cancers have worse psychosocial and quality of life outcomes compared with the general population of cancer patients, a recent study has shown.