Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 05 Jan 2018
The addition of an antihypertensive drug from a new class to a patient’s regimen results in huge decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and major cardiovascular (CV) events among those at high risk for CV events but without diabetes, suggests a recent study. Its effects on SBP remain large and similar in magnitude across all levels of baseline drug use and all subgroups of patients.
Pearl Toh, 4 days ago
A study finds no evidence that using pharmaceutical aids alone for smoking cessation helps improve the chances of successful quitting despite promising results in previous randomized trials and routine prescription of such drugs to help quit smoking.
Yesterday
The risk of stroke and subsequent mortality is significantly elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a recent study has shown.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 10 Jan 2018

Adding rifampicin to standard antibiotic therapy does not improve outcomes in individuals with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteraemia, the ARREST* trial shows. However, rifampicin may contribute towards a minor reduction in bacteraemia recurrence.

Prenatal bisphenol A exposure ups risk of allergic diseases in female babies

07 Jul 2017

Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) poses an increased risk of allergic diseases at a very early life in female infants, a study suggests.

Researchers looked at 412 women, examining their BPA concentrations in urine samples collected at delivery. All women later completed questionnaires to determine the occurrence of allergic diseases, such as eczema and wheeze, in infants at age 6 months.

Compared with mothers of infants without allergic diseases, mothers of neonates who developed allergic diseases had markedly higher urinary BPA levels (median, 4.55 vs 2.35 µg/l; p=0.03). Logistic regression analysis found an association between the increased risk of infant allergic diseases and creatinine-adjusted maternal urinary BPA concentrations. Such association was pronounced among female infants (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95 percent CI, 1.10 to 1.79) but not among males. When analysis was stratified by maternal age, the association was only significant among infants of mothers who were aged <25 years (OR, 1.90; 1.09 to 3.29).

Belonging to the class of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, BPA is used in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, such as food containers and can linings, with exposure levels detectable in more than 90 percent of human urine samples in previous surveys. The estimated exposure levels range from 0.01 to 13 μg/kg/day in children and are about 4.2 μg/kg/day in adults. [Endocrinology 2015;156, 882–895; Health Rep 2010;21:7–18]

BPA has been reported to easily cross the placenta, underscoring the potential harmful effects of BPA exposure on the foetus. Prenatal BPA exposure is said to negatively affect the immune function of the offspring. The effects include the augmentation of the T helper 1 and 2 immune responses, and allergic sensitization-induced allergic airway inflammation. [Am J Obstet Gynecol 2010;202:393.e1–7; Immunology 2004;112:489–95; PLoS One 2014;9:e100468]

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Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 05 Jan 2018
The addition of an antihypertensive drug from a new class to a patient’s regimen results in huge decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and major cardiovascular (CV) events among those at high risk for CV events but without diabetes, suggests a recent study. Its effects on SBP remain large and similar in magnitude across all levels of baseline drug use and all subgroups of patients.
Pearl Toh, 4 days ago
A study finds no evidence that using pharmaceutical aids alone for smoking cessation helps improve the chances of successful quitting despite promising results in previous randomized trials and routine prescription of such drugs to help quit smoking.
Yesterday
The risk of stroke and subsequent mortality is significantly elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a recent study has shown.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 10 Jan 2018

Adding rifampicin to standard antibiotic therapy does not improve outcomes in individuals with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteraemia, the ARREST* trial shows. However, rifampicin may contribute towards a minor reduction in bacteraemia recurrence.