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Roshini Claire Anthony, 4 days ago

The combined use of piperacillin and tazobactam does not appear to be a suitable alternative to meropenem for patients with bloodstream infections caused by ceftriaxone-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) or Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), according to results of the MERINO* trial.

Tristan Manalac, 19 May 2018
Taking oral antibiotics appears to increase the risk of nephrolithiasis, according to a recent study. Moreover, the risk seems to be compounded for individuals with recent antibiotic exposure and those who were exposed at a younger age.
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Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at increased risk of developing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or heart failure, although the prevalence of traditional risk factors for such cardiovascular disorders appears to be low, as reported in a recent study.
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Posture, balance impaired in women with chronic pelvic pain

05 May 2018

Women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) exhibit poor balance ability and posture compared with healthy counterparts, a study has found.

Researchers examined 48 women with CPP (mean age 41.05 years) and 48 healthy women (mean age 42.11 years). Balance ability was evaluated using Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test and Timed Up and Go Test, while posture was assessed using photogrammetry and Spinal Mouse.

There were significant between-group differences observed in all Mini Best Test subscales: total (p<0.001), anticipatory (p=0.002) and reactive postural control (p<0.001), sensory orientation (p<0.001), and dynamic gait (p<0.001).  This was also true for all Timed Up and Go test subscales: alone (p<0.001), with manual (p=0.002) and cognitive task (p=0.030).

Likewise, the CPP and healthy control groups significantly differed in terms of spinal cervical angles, such that women with CPP were more likely to exhibit a forward head posture, more deviation in global spine alignment, and increased thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis.

Cohen's d showed that some subscales of balance and posture tests showed a large effect size (d ≥0.8), indicating a more consistent result.

The present data suggest the importance of including balance and posture assessment in the routine assessment of women with CPP. Researchers noted that awareness of balance impairment and posture disturbances aid in performing an accurate and precise assessment, diagnosis and interpretation that should improve patient care.

Additionally, treatment of CPP symptoms should include an approach to improve balance and posture, they said.

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 4 days ago

The combined use of piperacillin and tazobactam does not appear to be a suitable alternative to meropenem for patients with bloodstream infections caused by ceftriaxone-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) or Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), according to results of the MERINO* trial.

Tristan Manalac, 19 May 2018
Taking oral antibiotics appears to increase the risk of nephrolithiasis, according to a recent study. Moreover, the risk seems to be compounded for individuals with recent antibiotic exposure and those who were exposed at a younger age.
2 days ago
Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at increased risk of developing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or heart failure, although the prevalence of traditional risk factors for such cardiovascular disorders appears to be low, as reported in a recent study.
3 days ago
Early renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RASI) leads to better short- and long-term renal outcomes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with antiphospholipid-associated nephropathy (aPLN), according to a study, adding that this renal protective effect is independent of RASI’s antihypertensive and antiproteinuric effects.