Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 5 days ago
Cycling was associated with reduced risk for both all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality in people with diabetes, according to a study presented at EASD 2020 Meeting — suggesting that cycling could be encouraged as an activity to prevent deaths in this population who are known to have a higher mortality risk than the general public.
Elaine Soliven, 6 days ago

Higher levels of exercise appear to be associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with no exercise at all, according to a study presented at EASD 2020.

Elvira Manzano, 07 Oct 2020
Exendin-4 imaging targeting GLP-1* receptor (GLP-1R) ably detects residual, dysfunctional pancreatic beta cells in individuals with long-standing type 1 diabetes (T1D), according to a study presented at EASD 2020. This breakthrough brings research closer to the possibility of restoring insulin-producing cells depleted in T1D.
Elvira Manzano, 12 Oct 2020
Taking regular hot baths may have a positive impact on glycaemia, blood pressure (BP), and body weight among Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes(T2D), according to a real-world study touted as the first to analyse the effect of heat therapy in T2D.

Postprandial hypotension common in diabetics

5 days ago

Postprandial hypotension (PPH) is common among diabetic patients and is tied to high systolic blood pressure (SBP) before meals, a new study has found.

The study included 300 diabetes patients (median age, 70 years) who were asked to measure their blood pressure at six points: just before and just after a meal, and 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after the main meal of the day. PPH was defined as an SBP decrease of ≥20 mm Hg relative to the pre-meal blood pressure within 2 hours after the meal.

Fifty percent (n=150) of the participants were positive for PPH, of whom only 15 experienced associated symptoms. Age, glycated haemoglobin, and pre-meal SBP were all elevated in PPH patients.

Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that higher SBP measurements before a meal significantly increased the risk of PPH by over 50 percent (odds ratio [OR], 1.56, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.30–1.86; p<0.001). This was also true, and even stronger, in the subgroup of patients who were not on antihypertensive medication (OR, 13.02, 95 percent CI, 1.63–103.93; p=0.012).

In another sub-analysis, the researchers found that age, glycated haemoglobin levels, and the coefficients of variation of R-R intervals were all likewise significant correlates asymptomatic PPH.

“Patients with diabetes need to be monitored for hypertension to prevent development of complications and PPH,” the researchers said. “Furthermore, treatment of older adults with diabetes, patients with uncontrolled diabetes, or diabetes-related autonomic nervous system disorders should include PPH monitoring, even when subjective symptoms have not been reported.”

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Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 5 days ago
Cycling was associated with reduced risk for both all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality in people with diabetes, according to a study presented at EASD 2020 Meeting — suggesting that cycling could be encouraged as an activity to prevent deaths in this population who are known to have a higher mortality risk than the general public.
Elaine Soliven, 6 days ago

Higher levels of exercise appear to be associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared with no exercise at all, according to a study presented at EASD 2020.

Elvira Manzano, 07 Oct 2020
Exendin-4 imaging targeting GLP-1* receptor (GLP-1R) ably detects residual, dysfunctional pancreatic beta cells in individuals with long-standing type 1 diabetes (T1D), according to a study presented at EASD 2020. This breakthrough brings research closer to the possibility of restoring insulin-producing cells depleted in T1D.
Elvira Manzano, 12 Oct 2020
Taking regular hot baths may have a positive impact on glycaemia, blood pressure (BP), and body weight among Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes(T2D), according to a real-world study touted as the first to analyse the effect of heat therapy in T2D.