Most Read Articles
Natalia Reoutova, 2 days ago

Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who have haematologic malignancies have a 28 percent mortality rate, according to data collected from 250 patients by the ASH Research Collaborative COVID-19 presented at the 62nd American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition (ASH 2020).

Roshini Claire Anthony, 01 Dec 2020

An evidence-based, multifaceted intervention aimed at reducing haemodialysis catheter-related bloodstream infections (HD-CRBSIs) failed to improve this outcome, results of the REDUCCTION* trial showed.

Tristan Manalac, 2 days ago
People are more likely to follow social distancing measures for the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic when they thought that their friends and family did the same, too, according to a new study.
Stephen Padilla, 04 Dec 2020
A retrospective study in a single centre in the Philippines has found that cancer patients with recent anticancer treatment, particularly chemotherapy, and who tested positive for the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have higher rates of severe complications. In addition, these patients tend to acquire infection in the hospital, which then leads to an increased risk of severe illness.

Portal hypertension persistent in over half of HCV patients even after SVR

28 Nov 2020

Clinically significant portal hypertension (CSPH) may persist for weeks in about half of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis, even after sustained virological response (SVR) has been achieved, a new study has found. This may indicate that risk of decompensation remains.

Researchers conducted a multicentre prospective study of 226 patients with HCV-related cirrhosis and CSPH. In all participants, antiviral therapy led to SVR. CSPH was defined as a hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) ≥10 mm Hg. Those with CSPH at 24 weeks after end of treatment (SVR 24) were offered another measurement opportunity at SVR 96.

At SVR 24, median HVPG was 13.4 mm Hg, down from 15.6 mm Hg at baseline, representing a significant change (p<0.01). At this first follow-up, however, only 50 patients (22 percent) had HVPG <10 mm Hg, and 176 patients still presented with CSPH.

Of those still with CSPH at SVR 24, 117 opted to undergo another haemodynamic measurement at SVR 96 and 59 opted out. The median HVPG among these patients dropped further to 12.0 mm Hg, and an additional 29 patients were able to drop below the CSPH threshold of 10 mm Hg.

In total, 79 patients were without CSPH at the end of follow-up, yielding an overall cumulative CSPH rate of 53 percent at SVR 96. If none of the 59 drop-outs achieved HVPG <10 mm Hg by SVR 96, the resulting cumulative rate of CSPH would have jumped to 65 percent.

Multivariate Cox regression analysis was then performed to determine significant predictors of clinical decompensation. As expected, high HVPG emerged as a significant risk factor (≥16 mm Hg: hazard ratio [HR], 6.3, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.4–28; p<0.01), as did having a history of ascites (HR, 7.7, 95 percent CI, 2.4–24; p<0.01).

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Most Read Articles
Natalia Reoutova, 2 days ago

Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who have haematologic malignancies have a 28 percent mortality rate, according to data collected from 250 patients by the ASH Research Collaborative COVID-19 presented at the 62nd American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition (ASH 2020).

Roshini Claire Anthony, 01 Dec 2020

An evidence-based, multifaceted intervention aimed at reducing haemodialysis catheter-related bloodstream infections (HD-CRBSIs) failed to improve this outcome, results of the REDUCCTION* trial showed.

Tristan Manalac, 2 days ago
People are more likely to follow social distancing measures for the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic when they thought that their friends and family did the same, too, according to a new study.
Stephen Padilla, 04 Dec 2020
A retrospective study in a single centre in the Philippines has found that cancer patients with recent anticancer treatment, particularly chemotherapy, and who tested positive for the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have higher rates of severe complications. In addition, these patients tend to acquire infection in the hospital, which then leads to an increased risk of severe illness.