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Roshini Claire Anthony, 5 days ago

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Poor health behaviours, greater harassment among transgender, gender nonconforming teens

31 Mar 2020
Children with gender dysphoria are at a greater mental health risk without family support to help them socially transition.

Transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) students are more likely to adopt poor health behaviours than their cisgender peers, a recent study has found.

“Compared with cisgender students, transgender students reported less healthy food intake, were more likely to be overweight or obese, bullied for weight or size, and physically inactive,” researchers said. “This study expands the limited literature regarding the health of transgender students and can inform tailored interventions to address health disparities.”

Drawing data from a large, cross-sectional, population-based survey of high school students, the research team found that out of 80,794 participants, around 2.7 percent (n=2,168) self-identified as TGNCs. Of this subset, more had been assigned female than male at birth.

Food frequency questionnaires showed that TGNC participants consumed more fast food on a daily basis, while eating fewer fruits and drinking less milk and water. This effect was stronger among those who were assigned female at birth, who reported even lower levels of fruit, vegetable and milk intake, and greater consumption of soda.

TGNCs assigned male at birth, in addition, had the highest mean daily intake levels of fast food, soda, and sports and energy drinks. As a result, TGNC participants were also more likely to be overweight or obese than their cisgender counterparts (34.7 percent vs 24.3 percent).

These adverse health behaviours were compounded by other social and lifestyle factors. TGNC participants were more likely to skip lunch and were less likely to engage in physical activity. They also faced greater rates of harassment and bullying because of their weight or size.

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 5 days ago

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

Stephen Padilla, 6 days ago
Use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV), similar to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), appears to lessen mortality but may increase the risk for transmission of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in healthcare workers, suggest the results of a study.
2 days ago
Use of corticosteroid is not associated with improved outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients admitted to the hospital with acute exacerbation (AE), reveals a recent study. In addition, corticosteroids may even contribute to reduced overall survival following exacerbation.
Dr. Wong Soon Tee, 6 days ago
Acne is a common skin problem seen in primary care. Dr Wong Soon Tee of Assurance Skin Clinic at Mt Elizabeth Novena Hospital, Singapore shares his insights with Pearl Toh on how to manage acne in the primary care setting.