Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 6 days ago

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

4 days ago
Use of corticosteroid is not associated with improved outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients admitted to the hospital with acute exacerbation (AE), reveals a recent study. In addition, corticosteroids may even contribute to reduced overall survival following exacerbation.
Dr. Wong Soon Tee, 28 May 2020
Acne is a common skin problem seen in primary care. Dr Wong Soon Tee of Assurance Skin Clinic at Mt Elizabeth Novena Hospital, Singapore shares his insights with Pearl Toh on how to manage acne in the primary care setting.
27 May 2020
The perception that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) cause multiple serious adverse effects (AEs) is supported by many internists, who then recommend treatment cessation even in patients at high risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), reveals a study.

Patients see, patients do: CRC screening uptake better when physicians themselves get tested

14 Mar 2020

A physician’s screening practices may affect their patients’, with the latter more likely to undergo colorectal cancer (CRC) screening if their physician has been tested, a new study has found.

Accessing administrative databases, researchers analysed data of 11,434 physicians and 45,736 matched non-physicians, all of whom were 52–74 years of age and were at average risk of CRC. Screening uptake was defined as having a record of faecal occult blood test in the past 2 years, flexible sigmoidoscopy in the past 5 years or colonoscopy in the past 10 years.

In the enrolled physicians, the uptake of CRC screening was 67.9 percent, only slightly but significantly higher than the 66.6 percent uptake rate in matched non-physicians (prevalence ratio, 1.02, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.00–1.03; p=0.01).

Specifically, while physicians were significantly more likely to undergo colonoscopy (prevalence ratio, 1.24, 95 percent CI, 1.22–1.26), they were much less likely to receive faecal occult blood testing (prevalence ratio, 0.44, 95 percent CI, 0.42–0.47).

Using billing claim frequency data, the researchers then matched patients to family physicians. This revealed that patients were significantly more likely to have undergone CRC testing if their doctor had done so as well (prevalence ratio, 1.10, 95 percent CI, 1.08–1.12).

Disaggregation according to the specific test showed a consistently strong effect of physician testing uptake: faecal occult blood test (prevalence ratio, 1.27, 95 percent CI, 1.21–1.33) and colonoscopy (prevalence ratio, 1.22, 95 percent CI, 1.20–1.25).

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Gastroenterology - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 6 days ago

For coffee drinkers, drinking filtered coffee may be tied to a lower mortality risk, including cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, a study from Norway suggested.

4 days ago
Use of corticosteroid is not associated with improved outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients admitted to the hospital with acute exacerbation (AE), reveals a recent study. In addition, corticosteroids may even contribute to reduced overall survival following exacerbation.
Dr. Wong Soon Tee, 28 May 2020
Acne is a common skin problem seen in primary care. Dr Wong Soon Tee of Assurance Skin Clinic at Mt Elizabeth Novena Hospital, Singapore shares his insights with Pearl Toh on how to manage acne in the primary care setting.
27 May 2020
The perception that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) cause multiple serious adverse effects (AEs) is supported by many internists, who then recommend treatment cessation even in patients at high risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), reveals a study.