Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 04 Sep 2019
Use of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2), as compared with dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), inhibitors appears to reduce the risk of heart failure and any-cause death without major cardiovascular events in the primary intention-to-treat analysis, according to a study.
Pearl Toh, 04 Sep 2019
More intensive LDL-lowering by adding ezetimibe to simvastatin in elderly individuals aged ≥75 years significantly reduced recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events without raising safety issues compared with simvastatin alone, a secondary analysis of the IMPROVE-IT* has shown.
27 Aug 2019
A once-weekly regimen of 25 mg trelagliptin is effective and safe for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease, reports a new study.
Elvira Manzano, 2 days ago

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), in an update of its 2013 recommendations, called on clinicians to offer risk-reducing medications to women who are at increased risk for breast cancer but at low risk for adverse effects.

Opioids unlikely to be helpful for long-term management of chronic noncancer pain

13 Jun 2019

The use of opioids may have limited long-term efficacy in the management of chronic noncancer pain (CNCP), reports a new study.

Researchers conducted a 2-year prospective cohort study including 529 CNCP patients (71.6 percent female). Propensity score matching was performed to control for characteristic differences between those with and without opioid use. The Brief Pain Inventory and short version of the Treatment Outcomes in Pain Survey were used to assess pain outcomes and quality of life.

At baseline, the prevalence of opioid prescription was 59.7 percent. Of the 316 prescriptions, 86 (16.2 percent) were for strong opioids. The overall rate rose to 60.3 percent (n=319) and 72.6 percent (n=384) after 5 and 12 months of follow-up. While there was a slight dip in overall prescription prevalence by 24 months (70.3 percent; n=372), prescription prevalence for strong opioids grew substantially (42.7 percent; n=226).

After propensity score matching, researchers found no clear indication that long-term opioid use held significant benefits. At 12 months, in nonusers, for example, the rates of clinical improvement in pain symptoms (p=0.014), physical function of the lower body (p=0.014) and severity (p=0.001) were significantly higher than their opioid-using counterparts.

In contrast, users showed a significantly higher rate of improvement in satisfaction with outcomes (p=0.030) and with care (p=0.044).

“Opioid users presented no improvement regarding pain relief, functional outcomes and quality of life over 2 years of follow-up. Therefore, our results support and highlight the limited effectiveness of opioids in long-term CNCP management,” said researchers.

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Pharmacist - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 04 Sep 2019
Use of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2), as compared with dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), inhibitors appears to reduce the risk of heart failure and any-cause death without major cardiovascular events in the primary intention-to-treat analysis, according to a study.
Pearl Toh, 04 Sep 2019
More intensive LDL-lowering by adding ezetimibe to simvastatin in elderly individuals aged ≥75 years significantly reduced recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events without raising safety issues compared with simvastatin alone, a secondary analysis of the IMPROVE-IT* has shown.
27 Aug 2019
A once-weekly regimen of 25 mg trelagliptin is effective and safe for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with severe renal impairment or end-stage renal disease, reports a new study.
Elvira Manzano, 2 days ago

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), in an update of its 2013 recommendations, called on clinicians to offer risk-reducing medications to women who are at increased risk for breast cancer but at low risk for adverse effects.