Most Read Articles
06 Jun 2019
Having at least four pregnancies through childbearing age appears to increase the risk of diabetes in postmenopausal women without a history of gestational diabetes, a study has found.
Stephen Padilla, 07 Oct 2019
Almost half of Asian patients with dyslipidaemia and hypertension, as well as half of those on pharmacotherapy, have achieved their blood pressure (BP) treatment goals, a Singapore study has shown. Moreover, BP goal attainment is significantly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) control.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 30 Jul 2019

Individuals who adhere to a plant-based diet, particularly one consisting of healthy plant-based foods, may reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a recent meta-analysis.

Roshini Claire Anthony, 08 May 2019

Engaging in vigorous physical activity for 75 minutes or more per week could reduce glucose levels in women trying to conceive, a recent study from Singapore showed. However, this impact was not demonstrated in women who engaged in moderate physical activity for 150 minutes or more per week.

Obesity contributes to increased risk of infections in men, women

13 Aug 2019

Individuals with obesity are at an elevated risk of developing infections, particularly that of the skin in both men and women, and those of the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts and sepsis in women only, according to a study.

The study population comprised 39,163 adults: 64 percent were women and 36 percent were men. Of the women, 63 percent had normal body weight, 29 percent were overweight, and 8 percent were obese; the corresponding proportions in men were 53 percent, 41 percent and 6 percent. In both genders, obese individuals had lower educational attainment, less likely to consume alcohol, more likely to be ex-smokers, engaged less in physical activity and more likely to have comorbidities at baseline.

Over a follow-up of 19 years (mean, 15.4 years), 12,652 individuals (32 percent) developed at least one infection requiring healthcare attention. There were 27,675 infections recorded, with a mean of 2.2 infections per person.

Cox analysis revealed an increased incidence of any infection in obese women (hazard ratio [HR], 1.22, 95 percent CI, 1.12–1.33) and obese men (HR, 1.25, 1.09–1.43) relative to normal-weight individuals.

With regard to specific infections, higher incidences were observed for skin infections in both genders (obese women: HR, 1.76, 1.47–2.12; obese men: HR, 1.74, 1.33–2.28), and for gastrointestinal tract infections (HR, 1.44, 1.19–1.75), urinary tract infections (HR, 1.30, 1.08–1.55) and sepsis (HR, 2.09, 1.46–2.99) in females only.

The mechanisms by which obesity may heighten the risk of infections involve impaired immunity via a leptin resistance, as well as altered respiratory physiology, skin folds and diminished peripheral blood perfusion, researchers explained. Additional studies differentiating by infectious agent are needed to draw conclusions about infections of different origins.

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Most Read Articles
06 Jun 2019
Having at least four pregnancies through childbearing age appears to increase the risk of diabetes in postmenopausal women without a history of gestational diabetes, a study has found.
Stephen Padilla, 07 Oct 2019
Almost half of Asian patients with dyslipidaemia and hypertension, as well as half of those on pharmacotherapy, have achieved their blood pressure (BP) treatment goals, a Singapore study has shown. Moreover, BP goal attainment is significantly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) control.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 30 Jul 2019

Individuals who adhere to a plant-based diet, particularly one consisting of healthy plant-based foods, may reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a recent meta-analysis.

Roshini Claire Anthony, 08 May 2019

Engaging in vigorous physical activity for 75 minutes or more per week could reduce glucose levels in women trying to conceive, a recent study from Singapore showed. However, this impact was not demonstrated in women who engaged in moderate physical activity for 150 minutes or more per week.