Most Read Articles
4 days ago
Prenatal and postpartum vitamin D supplementation does not appear to improve foetal or infant growth, a study reports.
6 days ago
Excessive daytime sleepiness appears to increase the long-term risk of amyloid β (Aβ) deposition, a recent study has shown.
6 days ago
Substituting diets high in carbohydrates with those high in monounsaturated fatty acids in the context of low saturated fatty acids do not appear to yield favourable effects on blood pressure, according to a meta-analysis.
2 days ago
Patients with chronic kidney disease appear to be at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) compared with the general population, with predictors including poor baseline glycaemic control and family history of diabetes mellitus, a study has found.

Obesity, overweight not linked to acute respiratory hospitalizations

07 Mar 2018

There appears to be no association between overweight or obesity status and the risk of hospitalization during winter respiratory seasons in both adults and children, a recent study has shown.

The study included individuals ≥2 years of age who had fever and/or acute respiratory symptoms over four winter respiratory symptoms. The primary outcome of hospitalization, along with secondary outcomes such as antibiotic prescription and length of stay, were predicted using multivariable logistic regression.

The cohort included 3,560 patients, of whom 749 were children and 2,811 were adults. The overall prevalence of overweight and obesity were 24.2 percent (21.0 percent children; 25.0 percent adults) and 36.4 percent (23.0 percent children; 40.0 percent adults), respectively.

In children, multivariate logistic regression showed that there was no significant association between overweight (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.7; 95 percent CI, 0.4–1.3) or obesity (adjusted OR, 1.2; 0.7–2.0) status and hospital admissions.

The secondary outcomes were also unrelated to weight status. Neither overweight nor obesity increased the likelihood of length of stay >2 days (adjusted OR, 1.5; 0.4–5.1 and adjusted OR, 0.7; 0.3–1.9), antibiotic prescription (adjusted OR, 0.7; 0.5–1.2 and adjusted OR, 0.8; 0.6–1.3) and oxygen requirement (adjusted OR, 0.5; 0.2–1.7 and adjusted OR, 1.3; 0.5–3.3).

The same general trend was observed for adults, except for those with class 3 obesity who were at a significantly higher risk of oxygen requirement (adjusted OR, 1.6; 1.1–2.5).

In contrast, the likelihood of the primary outcome was slightly lower in overweight patients (adjusted OR, 0.8; 0.6–1.0) and those with class 1 (adjusted OR, 0.7; 0.5–1.0) or 2 (adjusted OR, 0.6; 0.4–0.8) obesity.

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Doctor - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
4 days ago
Prenatal and postpartum vitamin D supplementation does not appear to improve foetal or infant growth, a study reports.
6 days ago
Excessive daytime sleepiness appears to increase the long-term risk of amyloid β (Aβ) deposition, a recent study has shown.
6 days ago
Substituting diets high in carbohydrates with those high in monounsaturated fatty acids in the context of low saturated fatty acids do not appear to yield favourable effects on blood pressure, according to a meta-analysis.
2 days ago
Patients with chronic kidney disease appear to be at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) compared with the general population, with predictors including poor baseline glycaemic control and family history of diabetes mellitus, a study has found.