Most Read Articles
2 days ago
Dairy consumption during adolescence or early adulthood does not appear to be associated with the overall risk of breast cancer, although results vary by hormone receptor status of tumours, a study has shown. Specifically, dairy intake is linked to higher ER–/PR– and lower ER+/PR+ cancer risk.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 5 days ago

The combined use of piperacillin and tazobactam does not appear to be a suitable alternative to meropenem for patients with bloodstream infections caused by ceftriaxone-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) or Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), according to results of the MERINO* trial.

3 days ago
Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at increased risk of developing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or heart failure, although the prevalence of traditional risk factors for such cardiovascular disorders appears to be low, as reported in a recent study.
4 days ago
Early renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RASI) leads to better short- and long-term renal outcomes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with antiphospholipid-associated nephropathy (aPLN), according to a study, adding that this renal protective effect is independent of RASI’s antihypertensive and antiproteinuric effects.

NSAIDs neither prevent nor promote AMD incidence

01 Feb 2018

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) appear to have little effect on the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a study has found.

The study included 51,371 men from the California Men’s Health Study. Those with self-reported exposure to aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, valdecoxib, celecoxib and/or rofecoxib at least 3 days per week were considered NSAID users. NSAID use was categorized into former, new, longer-term and nonuse, as well as by type (any NSAIDs, aspirin and/or nonaspirin NSAID).

During an average follow-up of 7.4 years, a total of 292 (0.6 percent) cases of exudative AMD and 1,536 (3 percent) cases of nonexudative AMD were documented.

The risk of exudative AMD was found to be reduced among longer-term users of any NSAID (hazard ratio [HR], 0.69; 95 percent CI, 0.50–0.96; p=0.029). On the other hand, the risk of nonexudative AMD was lower among new users of any NSAID (HR, 0.79; 0.68–0.93; p=0.0039) and among new users of aspirin (HR, 0.82; 0.70–0.97; p=0.018). This particular trend did not persist in longer-term users.

Relationships observed between exudative or nonexudative AMD and the remaining categories of NSAID use were not significant.

Findings of the present study show that the overall impact of NSAIDs on AMD incidence is small, researchers said. “However, the lower risk of exudative AMD in longer-term NSAID users may point to a protective effect and deserves further study as a possible mechanism to modulate disease risk.”

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Most Read Articles
2 days ago
Dairy consumption during adolescence or early adulthood does not appear to be associated with the overall risk of breast cancer, although results vary by hormone receptor status of tumours, a study has shown. Specifically, dairy intake is linked to higher ER–/PR– and lower ER+/PR+ cancer risk.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 5 days ago

The combined use of piperacillin and tazobactam does not appear to be a suitable alternative to meropenem for patients with bloodstream infections caused by ceftriaxone-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) or Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae), according to results of the MERINO* trial.

3 days ago
Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at increased risk of developing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or heart failure, although the prevalence of traditional risk factors for such cardiovascular disorders appears to be low, as reported in a recent study.
4 days ago
Early renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors (RASI) leads to better short- and long-term renal outcomes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with antiphospholipid-associated nephropathy (aPLN), according to a study, adding that this renal protective effect is independent of RASI’s antihypertensive and antiproteinuric effects.