Most Read Articles
Natalia Reoutova, 20 May 2020

Cancer patients infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appear to be at higher risk of severe outcomes, including death, but cancer type and treatment serve as better predictors, according to recent research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting I.

At the time of writing, COVID-19 has spread to more than 200 countries and territories, affecting an estimated 4.5 million people and killing over 300,000. Cancer, on the other hand, is newly diagnosed in 18 million people and takes the lives of 10 million every year.

“We have invited physician scientists who are at the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic, taking care of patients with cancer. They gathered prospective information to understand the effects of COVID-19 on patients with cancer, are testing new treatments, and are making this knowledge available to the global research community, so we can all benefit from their experience,” said Professor Antoni Ribas from UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, US, chairperson of the COVID-19 and cancer plenary session of the meeting.

Christina Lau, 12 May 2020

Patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have a past medical history of pneumonitis are at increased risk of treatment-related pneumonitis (TAP) from immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) regimens or chemotherapy alone, an analysis of clinical trial and real-world data has shown.

Novel telemedicine approach helps HNC survivors deal with body image issues

19 May 2020
The elderly, especially, can benefit from most from telemedicine.

A novel telemedicine-based cognitive-behavioural intervention may help manage body image disturbances (BIDs) in survivors of head and neck cancer (HNC), a new study reveals.

The study included 10 HNC survivors with Body Image Scale-determined BID. They underwent intervention using the BRIGHT* tool, which consisted of five weekly hour-long sessions delivered through a tablet. Assessments were performed at baseline and at 1 and 3 months after BRIGHT. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted to determine the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention.

One patient was lost to follow-up. The remaining nine patients successfully completed the course and were included in the subsequent analysis.

All but one of the participants moderately or strongly agreed that starting the programme a month after HNC treatment worked well. The same number of positive responses was earned for the use of telemedicine as a method of delivery. Satisfaction was likewise high, with 89 percent saying that they were likely to recommend BRIGHT to other HNC survivors.

Notably, a month after BRIGHT, eight of the nine remaining participants experienced a reduction in BID severity. By 3 months post-BRIGHT, this effect was true for all survivors. At the respective time points, Body Image Scales scores dropped by 4.56 and 3.56 points relative to baseline.

Moreover, the semi-structured interviews also showed that BRIGHT helped improve image coping behaviours.

*Building a Renews Image after Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

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Most Read Articles
Natalia Reoutova, 20 May 2020

Cancer patients infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appear to be at higher risk of severe outcomes, including death, but cancer type and treatment serve as better predictors, according to recent research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting I.

At the time of writing, COVID-19 has spread to more than 200 countries and territories, affecting an estimated 4.5 million people and killing over 300,000. Cancer, on the other hand, is newly diagnosed in 18 million people and takes the lives of 10 million every year.

“We have invited physician scientists who are at the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic, taking care of patients with cancer. They gathered prospective information to understand the effects of COVID-19 on patients with cancer, are testing new treatments, and are making this knowledge available to the global research community, so we can all benefit from their experience,” said Professor Antoni Ribas from UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, US, chairperson of the COVID-19 and cancer plenary session of the meeting.

Christina Lau, 12 May 2020

Patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have a past medical history of pneumonitis are at increased risk of treatment-related pneumonitis (TAP) from immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) regimens or chemotherapy alone, an analysis of clinical trial and real-world data has shown.