Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 27 Mar 2020
Every-two-month injections of the long-acting cabotegravir + rilpivirine were noninferior to once-monthly injections for virologic suppression at 48 weeks in people living with HIV*, according to the ATLAS-2M** study presented at CROI 2020 — thus providing a potential option with more convenient dosing.
3 days ago
Being overweight or obese in adolescence appears to increase the risk of papillary thyroid cancer in adulthood, a recent study has shown.
Stephen Padilla, 19 Mar 2020
The assumption that children are less vulnerable to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) compared to adults is not quite true and may even be dangerous, suggests a recent study.
Tristan Manalac, 6 days ago
While the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is generally mild in children, infants appear to be particularly susceptible to severe and critical infections, a new study has found.

Neurodevelopment in preemies unaffected by diet during early life

30 Dec 2019
Premature babies are prone to birth-related complications, with effects running well into their lives if they do not first succumb to death.

High-protein intake during the first 28 days after birth appears to improve weight growth in very preterm infants, a recent study has found. No such effect is reported for brain outcomes.

Researchers conducted a prospective cohort study of 149 infants who were born <30 weeks of gestation. Dietary information, such as average daily intake of energy, protein, fat and carbohydrates, were collected from birth until 28 days of age. Outcomes included changes in weight, head circumference z-scores and total brain tissue volume.

The mean energy intake during the first 28 days of life was 114.2±10.3 kcal/kg/day, with 71.8 percent of the infants meeting the guideline requirements. Similarly, majority of the population met the recommended intake levels of fat (90.6 percent; mean, 5.4±0.3 g/kg/d) and carbohydrates (96.6 percent; mean, 13.9±0.3 g/kg/d).

On the other hand, only 3.4 percent of the participants were able to satisfy the guideline intake levels for protein, with a mean consumption level of 2.9±0.3 g/kg/d during the first 28 days after birth.

Protein intake appeared to be correlated with better growth. Each additional 1 g/kg/d of mean protein led to an average increase of 0.05 (95 percent confidence intervals, 0.05–0.10; p=0.04) in weight z-scores per week.

However, diet had no effect on brain outcomes. Intake levels of energy (p=0.86), protein (p=0.17), fat (p=0.76) and carbohydrates (p=0.37), for instance, did not lead to significant changes in total volume. Similar null effects were reported for cortical grey matter, white matter, deep nuclear grey matter and cerebellum coefficients.

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS JPOG - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 27 Mar 2020
Every-two-month injections of the long-acting cabotegravir + rilpivirine were noninferior to once-monthly injections for virologic suppression at 48 weeks in people living with HIV*, according to the ATLAS-2M** study presented at CROI 2020 — thus providing a potential option with more convenient dosing.
3 days ago
Being overweight or obese in adolescence appears to increase the risk of papillary thyroid cancer in adulthood, a recent study has shown.
Stephen Padilla, 19 Mar 2020
The assumption that children are less vulnerable to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) compared to adults is not quite true and may even be dangerous, suggests a recent study.
Tristan Manalac, 6 days ago
While the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is generally mild in children, infants appear to be particularly susceptible to severe and critical infections, a new study has found.