Most Read Articles
Audrey Abella, 2 days ago
The anti–interferon-γ antibody emapalumab has shown signs of efficacy and safety in children with primary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), reveals a phase II/III study.
2 days ago
Use of cannabis is moderately associated with physical violence, and this association remains significant regardless of study design and adjustment for confounding factors, such as socioeconomic factors and other substance use, suggests a study.
Yesterday
More lenient harm minimization policies appear to be less effective at cutting alcohol-related problems during young adulthood compared with stricter, zero-tolerance measures, a recent study has found.

Modified low-protein formula supports adequate growth in infants

12 May 2020

Healthy term-born infants consuming a modified low-protein (mLP) formula from 1 month until 6 months of age show adequate growth comparable to those fed with a control formula, a recent study has shown.

In this double-blind, randomized controlled equivalence trial, infants were randomly assigned to receive either mLP (1.7 g protein/100 kcal; n=90) or control formula (2.1 g protein/100 kcal; n=88) from enrolment (age ≤45 days) to 6 months of age. A breastfed group served as reference (n=67). The investigators determined anthropometry and body composition at baseline, 17 weeks (including safety blood parameters) and 6 months of age.

The primary outcome of daily weight gain from baseline (mean age, 31±9 days) up to the age of 17 weeks was similar between the mLP and control formula groups (27.9 vs 28.8 g/day; difference, –0.86 g/day, 90 percent confidence interval [CI], –2.36 to 0.63). There were no differences seen in other growth parameters, body composition or adverse events.

Infants consuming mLP formula had significantly lower urea than those fed with control formula (–0.74 mmol/L, 95 percent CI, –0.97 to –0.51; p<0.001). Both formula groups, however, demonstrated significantly higher growth rates, fat mass, fat-free mass and several essential amino acids than the breastfed reference group.

“A high protein intake in early life is associated with a risk of obesity later in life,” the investigators said. “The essential amino acid requirements of formula-fed infants have been reassessed recently, enabling a reduction in total protein content and thus in protein intake.”

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS JPOG - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Audrey Abella, 2 days ago
The anti–interferon-γ antibody emapalumab has shown signs of efficacy and safety in children with primary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), reveals a phase II/III study.
2 days ago
Use of cannabis is moderately associated with physical violence, and this association remains significant regardless of study design and adjustment for confounding factors, such as socioeconomic factors and other substance use, suggests a study.
Yesterday
More lenient harm minimization policies appear to be less effective at cutting alcohol-related problems during young adulthood compared with stricter, zero-tolerance measures, a recent study has found.