Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 05 Jan 2018
The addition of an antihypertensive drug from a new class to a patient’s regimen results in huge decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and major cardiovascular (CV) events among those at high risk for CV events but without diabetes, suggests a recent study. Its effects on SBP remain large and similar in magnitude across all levels of baseline drug use and all subgroups of patients.
Pearl Toh, 3 days ago
A study finds no evidence that using pharmaceutical aids alone for smoking cessation helps improve the chances of successful quitting despite promising results in previous randomized trials and routine prescription of such drugs to help quit smoking.
04 Jan 2018
Thromboembolism is a major cause of death in patients with cancer, which is why clinicians should check for the symptoms of thromboembolic events right from the initial stages of bevacizumab treatment, suggests a recent study.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 4 days ago

The use of a cervical pessary may reduce the risk of preterm birth in women with singleton pregnancies and short cervical length, according to a single-centre study from Italy.

Metabolic syndrome worsens elderly depression

3 days ago

In elderly adults with depression, the presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) appears to increase symptom severity and disorder chronicity, a recent study has found.

In 435 elderly adults receiving an open-label, protocolized extended-release venlafaxine treatment, the unadjusted model showed a significantly longer time to remission in participants with baseline MetS (n=222) than in those without (n=211; hazard ratio [HR], 0.71; 95 percent CI; 0.52–0.95; p=0.02).

After adjusting for potential confounders, such as gender and depressive episodes, the significant relationships (HR, 0.86; 0.64–1.16) were attenuated

In terms of individual metabolic variables, a higher diastolic blood pressure (DBP; HR, 0.88 per 10 mm Hg increase; 0.77–0.995) and the presence of more MetS components (HR, 0.89 per additional component; 0.80–0.99) were associated with shorter time to remission, according to a univariate regression model.

In contrast, elevated high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels predicted shorter time to remission (HR, 1.11 per 10 mg/dL increase; 1.02–1.21). Only DBP remained significantly predictive in the adjusted model (HR, 0.87 per 10 mm Hg increase; 0.77–0.99).

A history of smoking (p=0.81), cerebrovascular disease (p=0.95) and cardiovascular disease (p=0.95), insulin levels (p=0.88), HDL-C (p=0.46), and total cholesterol (p=0.79) had no significant effects on the time to remission.

Finally, the use of medications for glucose, lipids and blood pressure, such as coprescribed beta-blockers or antihypertensives, did not significantly change the relationships between the metabolic and atherosclerotic variables and time to remission.

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Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 05 Jan 2018
The addition of an antihypertensive drug from a new class to a patient’s regimen results in huge decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and major cardiovascular (CV) events among those at high risk for CV events but without diabetes, suggests a recent study. Its effects on SBP remain large and similar in magnitude across all levels of baseline drug use and all subgroups of patients.
Pearl Toh, 3 days ago
A study finds no evidence that using pharmaceutical aids alone for smoking cessation helps improve the chances of successful quitting despite promising results in previous randomized trials and routine prescription of such drugs to help quit smoking.
04 Jan 2018
Thromboembolism is a major cause of death in patients with cancer, which is why clinicians should check for the symptoms of thromboembolic events right from the initial stages of bevacizumab treatment, suggests a recent study.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 4 days ago

The use of a cervical pessary may reduce the risk of preterm birth in women with singleton pregnancies and short cervical length, according to a single-centre study from Italy.