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Pearl Toh, 6 days ago
A study finds no evidence that using pharmaceutical aids alone for smoking cessation helps improve the chances of successful quitting despite promising results in previous randomized trials and routine prescription of such drugs to help quit smoking.
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Cancer patients at risk for recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) are less likely to experience recurrence with rivaroxaban compared with dalteparin, the Select-D trial has shown, ushering in a new standard of care (SoC) for cancer-related VTE.
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Metabolic syndrome worsens elderly depression

13 Jan 2018

In elderly adults with depression, the presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) appears to increase symptom severity and disorder chronicity, a recent study has found.

In 435 elderly adults receiving an open-label, protocolized extended-release venlafaxine treatment, the unadjusted model showed a significantly longer time to remission in participants with baseline MetS (n=222) than in those without (n=211; hazard ratio [HR], 0.71; 95 percent CI; 0.52–0.95; p=0.02).

After adjusting for potential confounders, such as gender and depressive episodes, the significant relationships (HR, 0.86; 0.64–1.16) were attenuated

In terms of individual metabolic variables, a higher diastolic blood pressure (DBP; HR, 0.88 per 10 mm Hg increase; 0.77–0.995) and the presence of more MetS components (HR, 0.89 per additional component; 0.80–0.99) were associated with shorter time to remission, according to a univariate regression model.

In contrast, elevated high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels predicted shorter time to remission (HR, 1.11 per 10 mg/dL increase; 1.02–1.21). Only DBP remained significantly predictive in the adjusted model (HR, 0.87 per 10 mm Hg increase; 0.77–0.99).

A history of smoking (p=0.81), cerebrovascular disease (p=0.95) and cardiovascular disease (p=0.95), insulin levels (p=0.88), HDL-C (p=0.46), and total cholesterol (p=0.79) had no significant effects on the time to remission.

Finally, the use of medications for glucose, lipids and blood pressure, such as coprescribed beta-blockers or antihypertensives, did not significantly change the relationships between the metabolic and atherosclerotic variables and time to remission.

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Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 6 days ago
A study finds no evidence that using pharmaceutical aids alone for smoking cessation helps improve the chances of successful quitting despite promising results in previous randomized trials and routine prescription of such drugs to help quit smoking.
Elvira Manzano, 3 days ago
Cancer patients at risk for recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) are less likely to experience recurrence with rivaroxaban compared with dalteparin, the Select-D trial has shown, ushering in a new standard of care (SoC) for cancer-related VTE.
2 days ago
Weight loss medications that have received the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval appear to confer only modest positive benefits for cardiometabolic risk profile, according to a study.
4 days ago
The risk of stroke and subsequent mortality is significantly elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a recent study has shown.