Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, Yesterday
Use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV), similar to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), appears to lessen mortality but may increase the risk for transmission of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in healthcare workers, suggest the results of a study.
14 May 2020
Webcast: Covid-19: What it means to your clinic. Practice pearls for the Asian primary care physician.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 08 May 2020

At present, there are no definitive treatments for COVID-19. More than 300 clinical trials are ongoing in the search for a cure. Some of the treatments being tested were previously used, with varying levels of efficacy, in the treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).

Pank Jit Sin, 21 May 2020

Persons suffering from asthma should pay particular attention to SARS-CoV-2 precautionary measures such as social distancing, regular handwashing, and wearing of masks on top of keeping their asthma in control. This is because data collected so far paints a bleaker picture for asthmatics than the normal population should they catch COVID-19.

Mepolizumab beneficial in severe eosinophilic asthma

24 Apr 2020

Use of mepolizumab in the treatment of severe eosinophilic asthma reduces exacerbation frequency and oral corticosteroid requirement, according to a study. Factors associated with better outcomes include nasal polyposis, lower body mass index (BMI) and lower maintenance prednisolone requirement.

Researchers examined the medical records of 99 patients who received 16 weeks of treatment with mepolizumab (100 mg administered subcutaneously). Clinical data were recorded every 4 weeks, with response assessed at weeks 16, 24 and 52. Response was defined as ≥50-percent decrease in exacerbation episodes, or a ≥50-percent drop in prednisolone dose for patients requiring maintenance oral corticosteroids (mOCS). Super-responders were defined as exacerbation-free and off mOCS at month 12.

Mean asthma exacerbation frequency decreased by 54 percent, from 4.04 at baseline to 1.86 at year 1 (p<0.001). Meanwhile, 68 patients were on mOCS at the time of mepolizumab initiation. The daily median dose dropped from 10 mg at baseline to 0 mg at year 1, and 57 percent of the patients on mOCS were able to discontinue treatment.

Overall, 72.7 percent of patients responded to mepolizumab; 28.3 percent were identified as super-responders. Baseline characteristics associated with responder and super-responder status were as follows: the presence of nasal polyposis (p=0.012), lower baseline 6-item Asthma Control Questionnaire score (p=0.006), a lower BMI (p=0.014), and a significantly lower prednisolone dose at baseline in patients on mOCS (p=0.005).

The 1-year responder status was correctly identified in 80.8 percent of the patients at week 16, and this number increased to 92.9 percent at week 24.

Mepolizumab was the first licensed anti-interleukin-5 mAb for severe eosinophilic asthma.

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Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, Yesterday
Use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV), similar to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), appears to lessen mortality but may increase the risk for transmission of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in healthcare workers, suggest the results of a study.
14 May 2020
Webcast: Covid-19: What it means to your clinic. Practice pearls for the Asian primary care physician.
Roshini Claire Anthony, 08 May 2020

At present, there are no definitive treatments for COVID-19. More than 300 clinical trials are ongoing in the search for a cure. Some of the treatments being tested were previously used, with varying levels of efficacy, in the treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).

Pank Jit Sin, 21 May 2020

Persons suffering from asthma should pay particular attention to SARS-CoV-2 precautionary measures such as social distancing, regular handwashing, and wearing of masks on top of keeping their asthma in control. This is because data collected so far paints a bleaker picture for asthmatics than the normal population should they catch COVID-19.