Most Read Articles
Dr Margaret Shi, 18 May 2020

A blood test is shown to be feasible and safe for early detection of multiple cancers in women with no current or known history of cancer, enabling early treatment with curative intent in a subset of individuals.

Christina Lau, 20 Apr 2020

Hippocampal avoidance during whole-brain radiotherapy (HA-WBRT), together with memantine, better preserves cognitive function vs WBRT plus memantine in patients with brain metastases, without compromising survival, a multi-institutional phase III trial has shown.

Natalia Reoutova, 20 May 2020

Cancer patients infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appear to be at higher risk of severe outcomes, including death, but cancer type and treatment serve as better predictors, according to recent research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting I.

At the time of writing, COVID-19 has spread to more than 200 countries and territories, affecting an estimated 4.5 million people and killing over 300,000. Cancer, on the other hand, is newly diagnosed in 18 million people and takes the lives of 10 million every year.

“We have invited physician scientists who are at the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic, taking care of patients with cancer. They gathered prospective information to understand the effects of COVID-19 on patients with cancer, are testing new treatments, and are making this knowledge available to the global research community, so we can all benefit from their experience,” said Professor Antoni Ribas from UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, US, chairperson of the COVID-19 and cancer plenary session of the meeting.

Natalia Reoutova, 28 May 2020

Fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) cycles in combination with endocrine therapy (ET) cause metabolic changes in hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer patients analogous to those observed in animal models, where they are associated with anticancer activity.

Low PNI, incomplete adjuvant chemotherapy worsens survival after gastric cancer resection

06 May 2020

Low preoperative prognostic nutritional index (PNI) has a significant impact on the completion of planned adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) following curative resection of stage II/III gastric cancer, a study has shown. Low PNI and incomplete AC confer an additive effect and lead to worse outcomes.

The investigators retrospectively reviewed medical records of 1,288 consecutive patients with stage II/III gastric cancer who underwent curative resection and planned to receive AC between November 2010 and December 2017.

X-tile was used to determine the optimal cutoff value of PNI for cancer-specific survival. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the independent predictive factors for incomplete AC. Finally, the investigators conducted Cox regression analyses to examine the relationship of low PNI, incomplete AC and cancer-specific survival.

Four hundred six (31.5 percent) of the 1,288 patients completed at least six cycles of AC within 6 months after initial AC (complete AC). Low PNI (<43.9; n=386) was independently associated with incomplete AC (less than six cycles). Moreover, poor cancer-specific survival was independently predicted by low PNI (hazard ratio [HR], 1.287, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.058–1.565) and incomplete AC (HR, 1.667, 95 percent CI, 1.342–2.071).

On further analysis, both low PNI and incomplete AC had an additive effect, resulting in an even worse cancer-specific survival.

“Further prospective studies are needed to clarify whether perioperative nutrition intervention could improve completion of AC and improve prognosis of gastric cancer patients,” the investigators said.

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Most Read Articles
Dr Margaret Shi, 18 May 2020

A blood test is shown to be feasible and safe for early detection of multiple cancers in women with no current or known history of cancer, enabling early treatment with curative intent in a subset of individuals.

Christina Lau, 20 Apr 2020

Hippocampal avoidance during whole-brain radiotherapy (HA-WBRT), together with memantine, better preserves cognitive function vs WBRT plus memantine in patients with brain metastases, without compromising survival, a multi-institutional phase III trial has shown.

Natalia Reoutova, 20 May 2020

Cancer patients infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appear to be at higher risk of severe outcomes, including death, but cancer type and treatment serve as better predictors, according to recent research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting I.

At the time of writing, COVID-19 has spread to more than 200 countries and territories, affecting an estimated 4.5 million people and killing over 300,000. Cancer, on the other hand, is newly diagnosed in 18 million people and takes the lives of 10 million every year.

“We have invited physician scientists who are at the epicentre of the COVID-19 pandemic, taking care of patients with cancer. They gathered prospective information to understand the effects of COVID-19 on patients with cancer, are testing new treatments, and are making this knowledge available to the global research community, so we can all benefit from their experience,” said Professor Antoni Ribas from UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, US, chairperson of the COVID-19 and cancer plenary session of the meeting.

Natalia Reoutova, 28 May 2020

Fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) cycles in combination with endocrine therapy (ET) cause metabolic changes in hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer patients analogous to those observed in animal models, where they are associated with anticancer activity.