Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 5 days ago
The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic appears to have a significant impact on oncological care, according to a study, which stresses the need for psycho-oncological support for cancer patients.
01 Aug 2020
Supplementation with probiotics may have positive effects in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), reports a recent meta-analysis.
5 days ago
Sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors increase the risk for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) by almost threefold, with molecule-specific analyses suggesting a class effect, according to a study.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 13 hours ago
Monthly prophylaxis with the fixed-dose combination of naphthoquine-azithromycin (NQAZ) is well tolerated and confers significant protection against infection with Plasmodium parasites among individuals residing in malaria-endemic areas in Southeast Asia, as shown in the results of a phase III trial.

Low-dose analgesics not a threat to male fecundity

29 Jun 2020

The use of pain medications at low doses by men does not hurt their chances of getting their partners pregnant, a study suggests.

Researchers looked at 1,956 men participating in Pregnancy Study Online. All male and female participants completed questionnaires on socio-demographics, lifestyle, medication use, and medical history at baseline. The women also accomplished bimonthly follow-up questionnaires for up to 12 months.

Of the male participants, more than half (51.7 percent) reported using at least one pain medication during the previous month. Commonly used analgesics were ibuprofen (35.8 percent) and acetaminophen (17.8 percent), with fewer men taking naproxen (5.7 percent) and aspirin (4.5 percent). The median cumulative monthly doses were 1,200, 1,300, 1,100, and 1,000 mg, respectively.

In proportional probabilities models, adjusted fecundability ratios were 1.02 (95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.91–1.13) for ibuprofen, 0.89 (95 percent CI, 0.77–1.03) for acetaminophen, 1.07 (95 percent CI, 0.85–1.35) for naproxen, and 1.05 (95 percent CI, 0.81–1.35) for aspirin, as compared with nonuse of each medication.

Younger men (<30 years) who used some types of pain medication appeared to have reduced fecundability, although small numbers prevented the researchers from drawing a firm conclusion.

The present data, along with currently available evidence from the literature, indicate the safety of common over-the-counter pain medications at low cumulative doses in relation to male fecundity, according to the researchers.

Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Stephen Padilla, 5 days ago
The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic appears to have a significant impact on oncological care, according to a study, which stresses the need for psycho-oncological support for cancer patients.
01 Aug 2020
Supplementation with probiotics may have positive effects in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), reports a recent meta-analysis.
5 days ago
Sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors increase the risk for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) by almost threefold, with molecule-specific analyses suggesting a class effect, according to a study.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 13 hours ago
Monthly prophylaxis with the fixed-dose combination of naphthoquine-azithromycin (NQAZ) is well tolerated and confers significant protection against infection with Plasmodium parasites among individuals residing in malaria-endemic areas in Southeast Asia, as shown in the results of a phase III trial.