Most Read Articles
3 days ago

Dr Michael Lim, a senior consultant at the Paediatric Pulmonary and Sleep Division, National University Hospital, Singapore, speaks to Roshini Claire Anthony on the rare disease that is cystic fibrosis.

Yesterday
Susceptibility‐guided therapy is as effective as empiric modified bismuth quadruple therapy for the first-line treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection, with both yielding excellent eradication rates, as shown in a recent trial.
3 days ago
It appears that long-term consumption of fish and omega-3 fatty acid does not influence the risk of incident hypertension in middle-aged and older men, suggests a US study.
Yesterday
The risk factors and outcomes associated with an increased risk of permanent pacing include atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, multivalve surgery and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III/IV, a recent study has found.

Low creatinine tied to diabetes risk

21 Apr 2019

There appears to be a link between low serum creatinine levels and a higher risk of diabetes, a recent study has shown.

The study included 31,343 male workers without diabetes at baseline (aged 20–64 at baseline), in whom the cumulative average of serum creatinine levels was collected over the course of the study. Diabetes was defined as fasting glucose levels ≥126 mg/dL, glycated haemoglobin ≥6.5 percent, random glucose levels ≥200 mg/dL or use of antidiabetic treatment.

Over a median observation period of 7.7 years, 2,509 participants developed diabetes, resulting in a crude incidence rate of 12.3 per 1,000 person-years. After adjusting for worksite and age, men with <0.70 mg/dL of serum creatinine were significantly more likely to develop diabetes than those with 0.9–1.2 mg/dL (hazard ratio [HR], 1.39; 95 percent CI, 1.18–1.58; ptrend<0.001).

This interaction was further pronounced after additional adjustments for dyslipidaemia, smoking, hypertension and body mass index (BMI; HR, 1.56; 1.35–1.82). The effect of low serum creatinine (<70 vs 0.90–1.20 mg/dL) was also significant in those with prediabetes at baseline (HR, 1.45; 1.23–1.70; ptrend<0.001).

In stratified analysis, researchers found that the effect of serum creatinine was significantly stronger in older vs younger adults (p=0.001). On the other hand, BMI, hypertension, smoking and dyslipidaemia did not appear to exert such a modifying effect.

“Screening serum creatinine levels can be used to identify those at a high risk of diabetes,” said researchers.

Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Doctor - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
3 days ago

Dr Michael Lim, a senior consultant at the Paediatric Pulmonary and Sleep Division, National University Hospital, Singapore, speaks to Roshini Claire Anthony on the rare disease that is cystic fibrosis.

Yesterday
Susceptibility‐guided therapy is as effective as empiric modified bismuth quadruple therapy for the first-line treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection, with both yielding excellent eradication rates, as shown in a recent trial.
3 days ago
It appears that long-term consumption of fish and omega-3 fatty acid does not influence the risk of incident hypertension in middle-aged and older men, suggests a US study.
Yesterday
The risk factors and outcomes associated with an increased risk of permanent pacing include atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, multivalve surgery and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class III/IV, a recent study has found.