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Longer sleep tied to better metabolic profile

09 Aug 2017
Many studies have investigated various risk factors that can contribute to snoring as well as its effects.

Longer sleep duration is positively associated with better metabolic profiles, a new study has shown. On the other hand, there is no direct correlation between sleep duration and dietary intake.

Analysis of sleep data of 1,615 adults showed that sleep duration was not significantly associated with energy (p=0.84), carbohydrate (p=0.66), fat (p=0.86) or protein (p=0.77) intake after adjusting for body mass index (BMI).

In contrast, an additional hour of sleep was significantly associated with a 0.03-mmol/L (95 percent CI, 0.00 to 0.05; p=0.03) increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) after adjusting for smoking, socioeconomic status, age, sex and ethnicity.

Additionally, an additional hour of sleep was significantly associated with 0.46-kg/m2 (-0.69 to -0.24; p<0.001) and 0.9-cm (-1.5 to -0.3; p=0.004) reductions in BMI and waist circumference, respectively.

In the unadjusted model, an additional hour of sleep was also significantly associated with a decrease of 0.07 mmol/L (-0.13 to 0.01 mmol/L; p=0.02) in triglyceride levels and of 0.13 (-0.25 to 0.00; p=0.05) in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels.

Sleep duration showed moderate negative associations with levels of fasting glucose (p=0.77), HbA1c (p=0.18), CRP (p=0.85), triglycerides (p=0.38) and free triiodothyronine (p=0.66) after adjusting for BMI, ethnicity, smoking, sex, age and socioeconomic status.

Study participants were enrolled in the National Diet and Nutrition Survey Rolling Programme (NDNS-RP) in the UK study. Those who were pregnant and who had incomplete sleep data were excluded.

Of the participants, 24.8 percent were current smokers, 20.5 percent were ex-smokers and 54.7 percent were nonsmokers. Mean sleep duration for males and females were 7.17±1.15 and 7.22±1.29 hours, respectively.

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Most Read Articles
6 days ago
Higher intake levels of coffee appear to be associated with reduced risk of developing chronic kidney disease, according to data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 5 days ago
Infants delivered via caesarean section may be at increased risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, according to a US study. Altered microbiota colonization is a possible explanation for this risk, although clear biological mechanisms have yet to be established.
4 days ago
Treatment with danegaptide does not improve myocardial salvage in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention, according to the results of a phase II study.
3 days ago
Men with high levels of exposure to diesel exhaust are at greater risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (AML), as shown in a recent study. This is not true for women.