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Roshini Claire Anthony, 3 days ago

Patients with mild hypertension who are at low risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) do not appear to derive mortality or CVD benefit from antihypertensive treatments, raising questions on the need for treatment in this population, according to a recent study from England.

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Longer sleep duration ups hypertension risk

5 days ago
Many studies have investigated various risk factors that can contribute to snoring as well as its effects.

People who sleep longer at night may be at a higher risk of diagnosed and undiagnosed hypertension, according to a recent study.

Researchers enrolled 37,317 participants (mean age 56.00±12.06 years; 22,843 females) who were classified according to the duration of sleep at night: <5, 5–6, 6–7, 7–8, 8–9, 9–10 and 10 hours. Logistic regression models were then used to determine the relationship between sleep duration and hypertension.

At baseline, 12,333 participants had hypertension. The age-standardized prevalence was higher for males than for females (21.24 percent vs 15.95 percent).

Analysis stratified according to sleep duration showed that in males, the age-adjusted prevalence of hypertension was higher in those with <5 vs 10 hours of sleep at night (33.77 percent vs 40.27 percent; p<0.001 for trend). The same was true for females (27.39 percent vs 32.48 percent; p<0.001).

Similar trends were observed for undiagnosed (males: 14.46 percent vs 25.13 percent; females: 9.20 percent vs 13.13 percent) and diagnosed (males: 24.70 percent vs 24.90 percent; females: 19.80 percent vs 22.55 percent; p<0.001 for trend for all) hypertension in those with <5 vs 10 hours of nightly sleep.

These findings were confirmed in regression models, which demonstrated that participants with longer sleep durations (10 hours) were significantly correlated with a higher risk of hypertension than those with 7–8 hours of sleep in males (odds ratio [OR], 1.52; 95 percent CI, 1.25–1.84). This effect was only approaching significance in females (OR, 1.11; 0.95–1.30).

Mediation analysis further found that levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol accounted for a significant 3.5 percent of the increased odds of hypertension in males with 10 hours of sleep at night (OR, 1.003; 1.001–1.137).

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Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, 3 days ago

Patients with mild hypertension who are at low risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) do not appear to derive mortality or CVD benefit from antihypertensive treatments, raising questions on the need for treatment in this population, according to a recent study from England.

Pearl Toh, 5 days ago
A personalized computerized neurofeedback intervention for training attention and memory shows potential in cognitive training for healthy elderly men, who improved in cognitive performance after the training, although no significant improvements were seen in the overall study population.
4 days ago
The simple Atrial fibrillation (AF) Better Care (ABC) pathway holistically updates the integrated care for AF patients and helps reduce the risk of adverse outcomes such as all-cause mortality, stroke/major bleeding/cardiovascular death and hospitalization, according to a study.
Yesterday
Type 1 diabetes impairs cognitive functioning in children, and this effect is exacerbated by extreme glycaemic levels, according to a recent meta-analysis.