Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 10 Jul 2018
A dual-hormone artificial pancreas (DAP) with a rapid delivery of insulin and pramlintide in a fixed ratio improves glycaemic control and reduces glucose variability in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) compared with first-generation artificial pancreas delivering insulin alone, according to a study presented at ADA 2018.
4 days ago
Chocolate consumption is not associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke or both combined in postmenopausal women free of pre-existing major chronic disease, a study suggests.
Pearl Toh, 5 days ago
More intensive lowering of LDL-C levels was associated with a progressively greater survival benefit than less intensive approach, when the baseline LDL-C levels were ≥100 mg/dL, reveals a meta-analysis of 34 randomized trials.
4 days ago
Switching from thiazide diuretic to ipragliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, leads to improvements in metabolic parameters and body mass composition without affecting blood pressure in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients, a recent study has found.

Long-term SSRI delays progression of mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer’s disease

08 Mar 2018

Long-term treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) appear to delay the progression of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer’s disease, a recent study has shown.

The study included 755 nondepressed individuals with amnestic MCI or early Alzheimer’s dementia and age-matched cognitively normal controls. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of depression history and antidepressant treatments on the conversion to dementia.

While baseline MCI was associated with a 2.60-fold higher likelihood of prior depression, subsequent conversion to Alzheimer’s dementia was not. The cumulative probabilities of progression to Alzheimer’s dementia were statistically comparable between those with and without a history of depression (p=0.38).

When restricting analysis to MCI patients with a history of depression, those who received long-term treatment with SSRIs (>4 years) had a significant delay in progression to Alzheimer’s dementia compared with those who were treated with other antidepressants (change in mean survival time, 891 days; p≤0.001) or who received only short-term SSRI treatment (change in mean survival time, 884 days; p=0.008).

Compared to those without a history of depression who did not receive antidepressants, those with prior depression who took other antidepressants had significantly higher conversion rates (change in mean survival time, –654 days; p=0.003).

“[W]e found a delay of approximately 3 years in MCI progression to Alzheimer’s dementia in patients with a previous depression who received long-term SSRI treatment. In contrast, treatment with non-SSRI antidepressants was associated with a higher risk of conversion of MCI to Alzheimer’s dementia and a shorter interval to progression compared with the long-term SSRI group,” researchers said.

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Most Read Articles
Pearl Toh, 10 Jul 2018
A dual-hormone artificial pancreas (DAP) with a rapid delivery of insulin and pramlintide in a fixed ratio improves glycaemic control and reduces glucose variability in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) compared with first-generation artificial pancreas delivering insulin alone, according to a study presented at ADA 2018.
4 days ago
Chocolate consumption is not associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke or both combined in postmenopausal women free of pre-existing major chronic disease, a study suggests.
Pearl Toh, 5 days ago
More intensive lowering of LDL-C levels was associated with a progressively greater survival benefit than less intensive approach, when the baseline LDL-C levels were ≥100 mg/dL, reveals a meta-analysis of 34 randomized trials.
4 days ago
Switching from thiazide diuretic to ipragliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, leads to improvements in metabolic parameters and body mass composition without affecting blood pressure in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients, a recent study has found.